Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Museum curator to explore Day of the Dead in Asheboro library talk

Day of the Dead sugar skull and figurines.
ASHEBORO -- The Day the of Dead is celebrated in Mexico simultaneously with the Catholic observances of All Saints and All Souls Days, November 1 and 2, as a festive time when families remember their dead and honor the continuity of life.

Join Sara Cromwell, curator of the Wake Forest University Museum of Anthropology’s annual Day of the Dead exhibit, for a talk entitled “Life After Death: The Day of the Dead in Mexico,” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 24, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Cromwell’s discussion of the unique Mexican observance will include its history, modern variations and associated folk art.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Library, it’s free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

History prof to explore role of American Indians during the Revolution in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO -- The often-overlooked history of the Native people of America’s Southeast in the Revolutionary War is the topic of a talk by UNC-Greensboro history professor Greg O’Brien at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, October 26, at the Asheboro Public Library.

O’Brien’s talk, “Southern Indians in the American Revolution,” is free and the public is invited. It is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

In much of what is now the southern United States, American Indians played a significant, even decisive, role as all sides relied on them as allies. Indian people pursued their own agendas and also had an impact on post-war economic and political development.

In addition to his teaching duties, O’Brien edits the journal Native South and has written extensively about native peoples of the Southeast.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Jugtown historian Steve Compton to trace pottery’s history in Asheboro library talk

Steve Compton
ASHEBORO – The history and influence of Jugtown Pottery will come to light in a talk by pottery historian and collector Steve Compton at 7 p.m. Thursday, October 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, Compton’s appearance is free and the public is invited.

His talk, “Jugtown Pottery 1917-2017: A Century of Art and Craft in Clay,” shares a title with the book he published in June tracing the pottery’s history.

Jugtown was founded by Jacques Busbee, an artist from Raleigh, and his wife Juliana. Arriving in Seagrove in 1917, they gave national exposure to the traditional potters of the area by featuring the area’s wares in Juliana’s Greenwich Village tea room and shop.

The enterprising couple later founded Jugtown and employed local potters, paving the way for the development of the Seagrove area as the nation’s pottery center.

Compton’s talk will feature images from his lavishly-illustrated book.

Compton is an avid collector of mid-18th to mid-20th century pottery and has penned numerous books and articles about it, including Seagrove Potteries Through Time and It’s just Dirt! The Historic Art Potteries of North Carolina’s Seagrove Region. Widely recognized for his expertise, he is frequently called on as a lecturer and exhibit curator.

He formerly served as president of the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, and is a founding organizer of the North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

History prof looks at youthful Revolutionary War soldiers in Asheboro library talk

Dr. Jake Rudman
ASHEBORO – Young soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution.

“Going for a soldier” forced young men to confront profound uncertainty and coercion, but serving in the military also offered novel opportunities.

Historian Dr. Jake Rudman will consider the experiences of these young men in “Becoming Men of Some Consequence: Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War,” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 28, at the Asheboro Public Library. The talk, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Based on his 2014 book of the same title, Rudman’s talk examines the soldiers’ relationships, economic goals and politics, and their visions of their own independence.

Rudman, who holds a PhD in American History from Yale University, is an associate professor of history at Wake Forest University.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Teens: build a homemade radio in Asheboro library event

ASHEBORO – Teens are invited to learn the basics of radio science and help build a radio at 5 p.m. Wednesday, September 27, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Find out about AM/FM frequencies and even try to hear sounds from outer space. Will the radio built by participants pick up local stations?

The workshop is free.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for more information.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Teens invited to learn basics of chess at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – All teens are invited to join Asheboro Chess Club founder Tom Hales for a beginners introduction to the greatest strategy game in the world in “The Basics of Chess,” 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, September 21, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Learn the fundamentals, the history of the game and find out about the Chess Club.

The workshop is free.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for more information.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Researcher Kevin P. Duffus returns to Asheboro library to reveal Black Beard’s last days

Kevin P. Duffus
ASHEBORO – What truly happened during Black Beard’s last days that precipitated his demise?

Who, truly, was Edward Teach, and whence did he come? What was his true name? And where may he have hidden his treasure?

Join researcher Kevin P. Duffus as he shares groundbreaking research into Black Beard’s life — and death — at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 20, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Duffus’s presentation, “The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate,” is free and the public is invited.

For years, Duffus wondered if it was possible to learn something new about the legendary pirate. After extensive research at archives in Great Britain, Pennsylvania and the Carolinas, he discovered that the answer was yes. And the true story about Black Beard’s last days substantially change the legend — and history.

Duffus, an award-winning author, researcher,  and filmmaker, has made significant discoveries about North Carolina history — starting when he was 17 and found a Confederate gunboat sunken in a river near his home.

He is author of The Lost Light: A Civil War Mystery, about his recovery of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse’s missing Fresnel lens, and War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast.

His appearance is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.