Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Randleman library to host session on Alzheimer’s disease

RANDLEMAN – The Randleman Public Library will host “Understanding Alzheimer’s and Dementia” at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 3.

Presented by the Western North Carolina Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, the event is free and the public is invited. Space is limited, so call the library at 336-498-3141 to sign up or for further information.

Alzheimer’s is not a part of normal aging, but a disease of the brain that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. The session will focus on:
· The impact of Alzheimer’s;
· The difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia;
· Alzheimer’s disease stages and risk factors;
· Current research and treatments available for some symptoms; and
· Alzheimer’s Association resources.

For more information about the Alzheimer’s Association, visit alz.org.

Performance speed painter Tim Decker to paint up a storm in Asheboro Sunset Series event

Performance speed painter Tim Decker creates a work
before the audience's eyes.
ASHEBORO – Performance speed painter Tim Decker will wow the crowd at the next installment of the Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 14, in downtown Asheboro’s historic Sunset Theatre.

Decker’s highly interactive, upbeat performance is free and the public is invited.

The Sunset Signature Series is sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library.

Decker is a nationally-touring artist who creates celebrity and patriotic portraits in front of a live audience. Each painting takes 4-7 minutes to complete and the whole experience is set to music.

A showman whose performances have been described as “spellbinding” and “knock-out,” he has appeared on the major television networks and the Hallmark channel, and the reality television show Hell’s Kitchen.

Decker performs at numerous fundraisers each year, where his appearances have raised over $1.5 million for various charities.  In 2014, he joined Late Night host Jimmy Kimmel at a Las Vegas fundraiser for the Dave Rice Foundation, where two paintings created that evening brought $15,000 during an auction. Decker painted a portrait of Kimmel before the event, which the host himself bought for a $10,000 contribution to the foundation.

Following Decker, the remaining Sunset Series 2020 events include:

  • Ken Jennings, “Greatest of All Time” Jeopardy champion, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 18; and
  • Top of the World, a tribute to the music of The Carpenters featuring Debbie Taylor and a seven-piece band, 7 p.m. Friday, May 22.
The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. Seating is first-come first-served.

For further information, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau at 800-626-2672.


Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Katie Snuggs Civil Rights talk at Asheboro library rescheduled due to weather threat

Katie Snuggs
ASHEBORO – Asheboro City Council member Katie Snuggs will talk about her experiences during the Civil Rights era in a talk at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 27, at the Asheboro Public Library. The event has been rescheduled from its initial date due to the threat of inclement weather.

Snuggs, the first African American woman elected to the city council, was a leader in integration struggles in Asheboro in the 1960s. She was arrested for participating in sit-ins at Hops Bar-B-Que Restaurant and the Little Castle Café in February, 1964.

Retired after a 22 year career as an administrative assistant in the city’s Water and Sewer Maintenance Department, Snuggs is a graduate of Central School and North Carolina A & T State University.

She is a member of the Asheboro Redevelopment Commission and leads her neighborhood community watch. She sits on several local boards, including Habitat for Humanity Randolph County, East Side Homes and East Side Local Development Corporation, and is a lifetime member of the Family Crisis Center.

Her talk is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Biographer to share insights on influential NC judge Sammie Chess Jr. in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – The trailblazing life of The Hon. Sammie Chess Jr. is the topic of the new biography, The Making and Measure of a Judge, by Joe L. Webster. 

Webster will talk about Chess’s life and contributions at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 5, at the Asheboro library.

Chess, of High Point, became North Carolina’s first African American superior court judge. He was active in the Civil Rights movement, and as an attorney, represented Asheboro residents arrested during sit-ins at Hops Bar-B-Que Restaurant in 1964.

Webster, a federal magistrate judge in the Middle District of North Carolina, will discuss Chess’s contributions to the Civil Rights struggle, the judiciary, and society in general.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Katie Snuggs to reflect on Asheboro during Civil Rights era in library talkKatie

Katie Snuggs
ASHEBORO – Asheboro City Council member Katie Snuggs will talk about her experiences during the Civil Rights era at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 20, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Snuggs, the first African American woman elected to the city council, was a leader in integration struggles in Asheboro in the 1960s. She was arrested for participating in sit-ins at Hops Bar-B-Que Restaurant and the Little Castle Café in February, 1964.

Retired after a 22 year career as an administrative assistant in the city’s Water and Sewer Maintenance Department, Snuggs is a graduate of Central School and North Carolina A & T State University.

She is a member of the Asheboro Redevelopment Commission and leads her neighborhood community watch. She sits on several local boards, including Habitat for Humanity Randolph County, East Side Homes and East Side Local Development Corporation, and is a lifetime member of the Family Crisis Center.

Her talk is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Eldora Allen to reflect on Randolph County during Civil Rights era in Randleman library talk


RANDLEMAN – The Randleman Public Library will present “Black History Retrospective: Retired Educator Eldora Allen Looks Back on Education and Integration in Randolph County in the 1960s” at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 4.

Allen, who taught for over 40 years at the elementary level in the Randolph County Schools, attended Central School in Asheboro through 11th grade, and was part of the first integrated graduating class at Asheboro High School.

Her talk will center around life before the change and the impact integration had on her and other in her graduating class.

The event is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 142 W. Academy Street. For further information, call 336-498-3141.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

A & T history prof Smallwood to examine African American impact on early NC in Asheboro library talk

Dr. Arwin Smallwood

ASHEBORO  -- North Carolina A & T history professor Dr. Arwin Smallwood will resume a talk called “The Origins and Early History of North Carolina” that he began in September, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 13, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Smallwood originally set out to discuss the three groups that generated early North Carolina’s prosperity — Native Americans, European settlers and enslaved African Americans. So engaging was his presentation, however, that he only got about halfway through his talk due to questions and lively discussion.

So Smallwood will return to focus on the African American side of the story. His talk, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

North Carolina’s history was shaped by a mixture of ethnic influences. The state’s waterways and forests sustained Native American villages that were replaced in the 18th Century by English plantations, cleared for whites by African and Indian slaves.

In his earlier talk, Smallwood traced the story of Native Americans, largely gone from the state for 200 years, except for small populations. Now, he will turn his attention to enslaved African Americans and their descendants through the struggles of slavery, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era.

The entwined histories are visible through dozens of maps Smallwood has created especially for this presentation, along with vivid illustrations of forgotten faces and moments from the past.

Smallwood was born in Windsor, North Carolina, and raised in Indian Woods, areas that figure prominently in his talks. He earned a bachelors degree in political science and a masters in history from North Carolina Central University, and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University.

Currently serving as chair of the N.C. A & T History Department, he has taught at Bradley University in Illinois and at the University of Memphis, where he helped develop a Ph.D. program in African American history, the only one of its kind in the country. He is recipient of numerous awards, fellowships and grants, and participated in the award-winning UNC-TV documentary “The Birth of a Colony: North Carolina.”

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.