Thursday, May 9, 2019

Kids can read to therapy dog at Franklinville library

FRANKLINVILLE – Children can read to a therapy dog as the Franklinville Public Library hosts a special “Tails to Read” from 2:30-3:30 p.m. Sunday, May 19.

Tails to Read, also offered regularly at the Asheboro library, is a research-based program that enables kids to build their reading skills and confidence by reading aloud to a friendly, non-judgmental therapy dog.

Reading times are limited, so call the Franklinville library 336-685-3100 to sign up or for further information. The library is located at 111 Sumner Place.

For more information about Tails to Read at the Asheboro library, call 336-318-6804.

Multi-instrumentalists Hicks and Manring to perform Irish and American folk tunes at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO -- Join Greensboro-based musicians Travis Hicks and Scott Manring for an evening of Irish and American folk music at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 20, at the Asheboro Public Library. 
    
Hicks will perform on Irish bagpipes and tin whistles, and Manring will join in on a variety of stringed instruments. The performance, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Hicks, whose avocation is music, is an assistant professor in the Interior Architecture Department at UNC-Greensboro and director of the Center for Community-Engaged Design. Manring is a multi-instrumentalist and music teacher in Greensboro.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Go stargazing in exclusive observatory event for Randolph library participants

ASHEBORO – “Let’s Go Stargazing” at the Three College Observatory near Graham in an event exclusively for Randolph County Public Library participants.

Space is limited to 30 for the event, which is scheduled for 8:45 p.m. Wednesday, May 29.  Visit the Asheboro Public Library Reference Desk or call 336-318-6803 to sign up.

Transportation to the observatory, which is located at 5106 Thompson Mill Road, Graham, is on your own.

Observatory staff will guide stargazers through viewing deep sky objects such as the Messier 3 and 11 globular star clusters, and possible galaxies, nebulae and a double star. Jupiter will be visible and possibly Saturn — spectacular when viewed through the observatory’s 32” telescope, one of the largest in the southeastern United States.

The experience also will include outdoor observation of constellations. The entire program lasts about an hour.

The Three College Observatory, in a dark-sky area, is operated jointly by UNC-Greensboro, N.C. A & T State University and Guilford College.

On May 29, participants should call 336-318-6803 by 6 p.m. to verify that the weather is clear enough to hold the event.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Historian to explore Lost Colony mystery in Asheboro library talk


ASHEBORO  -- One of North Carolina’s greatest mysteries lies in the question, “What happened to the Lost Colony?”

Were the colonists killed? Did they move into the interior? Were they captured by Indians?

Join historian Dr. Arwin Smallwood as he explores “The Mysteries of the Lost Colony and the Iroquois Confederacy,” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 13, at the Asheboro Public Library.  The talk is free and the public is invited.

Smallwood draws on 30 years of research in archives in North Carolina, Virginia, New York and Canada to offer an answer to what happened to the colonists, and also to explain some of North Carolina’s and Virginia’s hidden history — particularly the interactions of the Tuscarora  people with Africans and Europeans.

He also considers recent discoveries in eastern North Carolina — in Bertie County in particular — as well as newly-uncovered maps, artifacts, human remains, colonial records and oral histories that yield fascinating clues.

Beyond the Lost Colony itself, Smallwood’s talk will spark discussion about the state’s complex history and the co-mingled heritage of who make up the American “melting pot.”

A Windsor, N.C., native, Smallwood is a professor at North Carolina A & T State University, where he is chair of the Department of History. He holds a master’s in history from North Carolina Central University, and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University.

He is author of several books and articles, and focuses his research on the relationships between African-Americans, Native Americans and Europeans in eastern North Carolina during the colonial and early antebellum periods. Recipient of a number of fellowships and grants, Smallwood also participated in the award-winning UNC-TV documentary The Birth of a Colony: North Carolina.

Smallwood’s appearance, part of the Road Scholar series, is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Popular “Matter of Balance” fall-prevention classes return to Asheboro library

ASHEBORO -- Many older adults fear falling, and restrict their activities on account of that concern.

In “A Matter of Balance,” an eight-week series of workshops returning to the Asheboro Public Library from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesdays beginning May 7, participants will learn to view falls and fear of falling as controllable, and will develop the ability to set realistic goals to increase activity, change their environment to reduce fall risk factors, and exercise to increase strength and balance.

The course is free, but space is limited; visit the Reference Desk or call 336-318-6803 to sign up.

Each class builds on the previous classes to emphasize practical strategies to reduce fear of falling and increase activity levels.

Offered in conjunction with the Piedmont Triad Regional Council Area Agency on Aging, the nationally-recognized program was developed at the Roybal Center for Active Lifestyle Interventions at Boston University.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street.

Learn to plan “family history family reunion” in Asheboro library workshop


ASHEBORO – Pick up some tips for planning a fun family reunion while getting your relatives interested in family history, in “Planning a Family History Family Reunion,” 7-9 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at the Asheboro library.

The class, presented by Randolph Room staff member Kendra Lyons, is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call the Randolph Room at 336-318-6815.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

“Let’s Talk Turtles” at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – Come out of your shell for “Let’s Talk Turtles” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 29, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The informal presentation by biologist Melanie Stadler will describe the basic differences between turtles, tortoises and terrapins, and provide a detailed look at the sea turtle species that inhabit the waters and nest on the beaches of North Carolina.

Stadler also will discuss what makes each sea turtle species unique; why they are important indicators of the planet’s health; what threats they face; and what participants can do to help them survive.

Stadler holds a master’s degree in biology from Florida Atlantic University and for the past eight years has worked as a sea turtle biologist in Florida. She recently relocated to Greensboro to begin work on a Ph.D. in Geography, Environment and Sustainability at UNC-Greensboro, focusing on threatened bog turtles and their habitats.

Her presentation is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Monday, April 8, 2019

Sunset Series talk to feature Jerry Bledsoe

Jerry Bledsoe
ASHEBORO – Catch up with New York Times #1 bestselling author Jerry Bledsoe as he talks about how he found his calling as a writer during the turbulent 1960s in the third installment of the 2019 Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 2, at the historic Sunset Theatre in downtown Asheboro.

Bledsoe’s talk is free and the public is invited. The Sunset Signature Series is sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Library.

Bledsoe will share stories – some hilarious and some poignant – from his new memoir Do-Good Boy: An Unlikely Writer Confronts the ‘60s and Other Indignities. From his days as an 18-year-old Army enlistee assigned as an unlikely military journalist even though he had flunked high school English to the beginnings of his widely-read column at the Greensboro Daily News, Bledsoe recounts his experiences in the Army, his coverage of the Civil Rights movement in the Triad, his interview with a then-unknown Jimi Hendrix, his encounter with a very angry garden club, and many more adventures.

A Danville native who grew up in Thomasville, Bledsoe worked at newspapers in Kannapolis, Charlotte and Greensboro, where his regular column became an institution. He was a contributing editor for Esquire, and also wrote for Rolling Stone and New York  magazines.

His first book was The World’s Number One, Flat-Out. All-Time Great Stock Car Racing Book published in 1975. Twenty more books have followed, including compilations of his columns and titles such as You Can’t Live on Radishes, From Whalebone to Hothouse: A Journey Along North Carolina’s Longest Highway, U.S. 64 and North Carolina Curiosities: Jerry Bledsoe’s Outlandish Guide to the Dadblamedest Things to See and Do in North Carolina.

His newspaper series documenting the horrific Klenner-Lynch murders in the mid-1980s became the New York Times #1 bestselling book Bitter Blood, which was followed by other true crime tales including Blood Games, Before He Wakes and Death Sentence. Bledsoe also ventured into fiction, with the nostalgic The Angel Doll in 1996 and its follow-up, A Gift of Angels.

Bitter Blood, Blood Games and The Angel Doll have been made into TV miniseries or movies.

Bledsoe also established Down Home Press, a publishing company, and wrote investigative articles for The Rhinoceros Times in Greensboro.

He and his wife Linda live in Asheboro.

The final Sunset Series event for 2019 will feature University of North Carolina basketball titan Eric Montross at 7  p.m. Saturday, September 21.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau at 800-626-2672.

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Learn about the moon and beyond at Asheboro library Star Party

ASHEBORO – Observe the first quarter moon and learn about the moon and space with NASA Solar System Ambassador Capt. Mike Lucas in “Star Party Friday” from 4-6 p.m. Friday, April 12, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The event, for the whole family, is free and the public is invited. Activities are for children of any age; Lucas’s talk is best for ages 8 and up.

Outdoor activities will include moon observation with kid binoculars and standard telescopes (use the library’s or bring your own), and messy moon crater experiments. Indoor activities will include moon phase investigations and science–themed crafts.

Lucas, from Kernersville, is a retired pilot with over 26,000 flying hours. He has had a fascination with spaceflight since childhood, and has met most of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts.

He holds a bachelors degree in history from the University of Houston, and speaks frequently on NASA history and solar system exploration.

The library’s Star Party is part of the 7th Annual Statewide Star Party taking place on April 12-13, with astronomy clubs, parks, universities, planetariums, science centers and libraries hosting public skywatching parties across the state. This year’s theme is “the Moon and Beyond” in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the 1969 moon landing.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

Historian Kevin Duffus to tackle mystery of missing Hatteras light in Asheboro library talk

Kevin Duffus
ASHEBORO – Popular historian and author Kevin Duffus will return to the Asheboro Public Library with the tale of how he found the lost original lens of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse — a national treasure — at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 23.

The French-manufactured 1803 Fresnel (pronounced fer-NEL) lens was missing for 140 years. One of the first made for a U.S. lighthouse, it was displayed at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York City. During the Civil War, the
12-foot tall, 6,000-pound bronze and glass optic was removed by Confederate authorities, and was lost.

Duffus chronicled his successful search for the lens, which also unearthed a wealth of lighthouse lore and reached into his own family history, in his book The Lost Light: The Mystery of the Missing Cape Hatteras Fresnel Lens, published in 2003.

An award-winning author, researcher and filmmaker, Duffus has made significant discoveries about North Carolina history, starting at age 17 when he found a Confederate gunboat sunken in a river near his home, and extending to groundbreaking conclusions about Blackbeard and his treasure.

His appearance, part of the Road Scholar series, is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Sons to remember Woody Durham in Randolph library Friends event

Woody Durham
ASHEBORO – “The Voice of the Tar Heels” — Woody Durham — will be remembered by his sons Wes and Taylor Durham in a Friends of the Randolph County Public Library event at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, at Pinewood Country Club.
              
Tickets are $30 and are on sale now at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street. Heavy hors d’ouevres are included in the ticket price; there will be a cash bar.

Taylor and Wes will share memories about their sportscaster father and stories from his career. Woody’s wife, Jean, also will be on hand for the event.

Woody Durham, who passed away in 2018, was known as the “Voice of the Tar Heels” during his 40-year career as play-by-play announcer for the University of North Carolina men’s basketball and football programs.

Wes Durham has been the radio play-by-play voice of the Atlanta Falcons since 2004, and is in his sixth season as the primary play-by-play announcer for the Atlantic Coast Conference on Fox Sports South and the ACC Network. He is an 11-time winner of the Georgia Sportscaster of the Year award from the National Sports Media Association.

Taylor Durham is in his 10th year with Elon Athletics as The Voice of the Phoenix, and his 19th year with Learfield IMG College, handling all aspects of Elon football, basketball and baseball broadcasts while also helping to cultivate corporate partnerships with Elon Athletics.

For further information, call 336-318-6801.
Taylor and Wes Durham 

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

One-woman show at Asheboro library portrays ‘The Spirit of Harriet Tubman’

Diane Faison as Harriet Tubman
ASHEBORO  -- Experience history through “The Spirit of Harriet Tubman” as Gibsonville performer Diane Faison brings the famed abolitionist to life at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The one-woman show is sponsored by the Friends of the Library in honor of Women’s History Month. It is free and the public is invited.

Tubman, born in 1822, escaped a brutal existence as an enslaved person to establish the Underground Railroad and advocate tirelessly for abolition. She served in the United States Army during the Civil War, and afterwards became an advocate for women’s suffrage.

An art teacher in North Carolina and Virginia for 25 years before retiring, Faison wanted students to feel history, rather than just researching it.

She studied Tubman’s life and developed her one-woman play, which her husband, a history teacher, asked her to perform for his students.

Since then, she has performed multiple times each month for close to 30 years in schools, colleges, libraries, churches and retirement homes. A Winston-Salem native, Faison holds a bachelors of arts in art appreciation from North Carolina Central University. She has received grants from the Winston-Salem and Alamance arts councils, and the Puffin Foundation.

The Asheboro library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803. 

Friday, March 1, 2019

Randolph library Friends to host ‘Trivia on Tap’ at Four Saints

ASHEBORO – Test your knowledge of books and authors, pop culture, and local history – and support the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library – at “Trivia on Tap,” 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 1, at Four Saints Brewing Company.

Ticket price is $25 per person, and includes food and the trivia competition. Proceeds go to support Friends programs such as Books for Babies, children’s activities at the library, and literacy.

Tickets are on sale at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6801 to reserve tickets or for more information.

Emcee Rich Powell returns for the friendly competition, in which participants will answer three rounds of trivia questions in teams. Participants may sign up in groups as teams, or simply join a team on arrival.

The name of the winning team and its members will be displayed on the Friends Trivia Champion trophy at the Asheboro library.

There will be a cash bar. Four Saints is located at 218 S. Fayetteville St. in Asheboro.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Author to follow Daniel Boone’s footsteps in Asheboro library talk

Randell Jones
ASHEBORO – Go “In the Footsteps of Daniel Boone” with award-winning author and storyteller Randell Jones at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 12, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Boone led one of the fullest and most eventful lives in American history as a hunter, frontier guide, wilderness scout, militia leader, woodsman, land speculator, merchant and more — and spent 21 years in North Carolina.

Daniel Boone
Jones will  trace the life of Boone by placing Boone’s adventures on the landscape and taking the audience to some of the 85 sites across 11 states, from Pennsylvania to Missouri, where the pioneer hero left his mark.

“In the Footsteps of Daniel Boone” is based on Jones’s book by the same name. Jones, who lives in Winston-Salem, also is author of Scoundrels, Rogues and Heroes of the Old North State, Before They Were Heroes at Kings Mountain, and several other titles about the pioneer era and the American Revolution.

Jones’s appearance, part of the Road Scholar series, is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

La Leche League representative to offer breastfeeding advice in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – Join Laura Evans of the La Leche League of Greensboro for “Milk for Everyone: An Overview of Breastfeeding Benefits and Stages” at 10:30 a.m. Friday, March 8, at the Asheboro Public Library. The talk is free and expectant/nursing mothers are invited.

Evans will cover the benefits of breastfeeding for families, transition to work, introduction of solid foods and other topics, with time for discussion.

A working mother of two, Evans is a volunteer with the La Leche League of Greensboro.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Jim Avett: An honest man shares his love of life and music in Asheboro Sunset Series performance

Jim Avett
ASHEBORO – Son of a Methodist minister and a classical pianist, Jim Avett grew up in a home full of love and music, where he learned the importance of hard work and honest living.

Avett, a lifelong songwriter and musician, only turned to full time performing after retiring from a welding business he operated for 35 years to provide for his own family.

Now with four albums to his name and international acclaim, Avett will anchor the second installment of the 2019 Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series at
7 p.m. Friday, March 15, in downtown Asheboro’s historic Sunset Theatre.

The performance, sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, is free and the public is invited. Seating is on a first-come first-served basis.

Avett’s shows are a combination of beloved country tunes, his original ballads and stories he tells to introduce the songs. His performances have been characterized as spending the evening on the front porch, singing and talking with a good friend.

A North Carolina native who now lives in Cabarrus County, Avett released his first album, Jim Avett and Family, in 2008. It featured sons Scott and Seth — the Avett Brothers — and daughter Bonnie.

His next album, 2010’s Tribes, featured original songs ranging from soulful love ballads like the title track to the more lighthearted “Fight with a Bottle of Booze” – and a murder ballad that will ring especially true with Randolph County audiences, “Naomi.”

Listeners could find classic country and early rock ‘n’ roll influences on Second Chances in 2010, in which Avett drew on his life experiences to write songs about love, boyhood memories and loss. He followed that with For His Children and Ours in 2017.

The Sunset Signature Series will feature two more events in 2019: author Jerry Bledsoe, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 2; and UNC basketball titan Eric Montross, 7 p.m. Saturday, September 21.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information, call 800-626-2672.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday with The Cat in the Hat at all Randolph libraries

ASHEBORO -- Meet The Cat in the Hat and other crazy characters during the first week in March as all seven public libraries in Randolph County celebrate the birthday of Dr. Seuss.

The Cat, a.k.a. storyteller and illusionist Caleb Sigmon, will appear for a performance and meet-and-greet at all the libraries as follows:

· Archdale: 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, 10433 S. Main Street.;
· Asheboro: 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 8, 201 Worth Street.;
· Franklinville: 4 p.m. Thursday, March 7, 111 Sumner Place;
· Liberty: 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, 239 S. Fayetteville Street;
· Ramseur: 10:30 a.m. Thursday, March 7, 1512 S. Main Street;
· Randleman: 3:30 p.m. Friday, March 8, 142 W. Academy Street;
· Seagrove: 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, 530 Old Plank Road.

The performances, sponsored by the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, are free and the public is invited.

The fun, interactive events will feature live actors, puppets, music and audience participation, followed by a Meet-and-Greet with the Cat.

Sigmon visited the Asheboro library in December as the Grinch, drawing an audience of over 300.

Performing a variety of shows 150 times a year with a unique blend of magic, drama and storytelling, Sigmon is a mainstay of libraries, schools, churches and performing arts centers.  He has appeared at venues ranging from the Virginia Beach Boardwalk to the Johnny Carson Theatre in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Dr. Seuss’s actual birthday is March 2.

For further information, call 336-318-6804.

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Liberty library to host talk on antebellum potters

LIBERTY – Join Liberty-area potter and historian Brenda Hornsby Heindl for “Poetry and Pottery: Free and Enslaved Potters Working in the South,” at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 19, at the Liberty Public Library.

Hornsby Heindl will talk about the intersection of pottery and poetry as both free and enslaved potters navigated their lives.

Her talk is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 239 S. Fayetteville Street. For further information, call 336-622-4605.

Learn about heart health for women in Asheboro library class

ASHEBORO – Learn about management and prevention of cardiovascular disease in “The Heart of the Matter for Women,” 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 21, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Sheri Millikan, Clinical Service Manager, Cardiac Services, at Randolph Health, will help attendees identify risk factors that increase the chance of heart disease for women, and review the most recent data on menopause, inflammation and Vitamin D associated with the illness. Participants will be able to develop a plan for improved heart care.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Extension agent Ben Grandon to share backyard gardening tips at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – Calling all gardeners!

North Carolina’s long growing season is almost here. Join Ben Grandon of Randolph County Cooperative Extension for “Beginner Backyard Gardening” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 26, at the Asheboro Public Library, as he offers an overview of what supplies and equipment you may need, answers gardening questions, and talks about services available at Cooperative Extension to ensure a bountiful harvest.

Grandon’s talk is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Liberty library workshops focus on living with chronic conditions

LIBERTY – Did you know that four out of five Americans over the age of 50 suffer from at least one chronic condition?

Learn about “Living Healthy with Chronic Conditions” in a series of six weekly classes beginning Tuesday, February 12, 1:00-3:30 p.m., at the Liberty Public Library.

Presenters from the Piedmont Triad Area Agency on Aging will offer interactive, research-based workshops that will help participants improve their health, communicate with doctors, and manage difficult emotions.

The classes are free, but please call the library to register at 336-622-4605, or email librarian Charity Neave Johnson, cjohnson@randolphlibrary.org.

The Liberty library is located at 239 S. Fayetteville Street.

Franklinville library offers chair cardio class for seniors

FRANKLINVILLLE – Get fit in a “Chair Cardio Exercise Class for Seniors” at the Franklinville Public Library, noon-1 p.m. Wednesdays, February 6 and February 20.

The class will help seniors learn how to build strength through chair cardio exercises, find out how to participate in this spring’s Senior Games, and discover more about the Asheboro Senior Center.

The class is free and all seniors are invited; no registration is required.

The library is located at 111 Sumner Place. For further information, call 336-685-3100.

Thursday, January 3, 2019

We Are Charleston: trio reflects on mass shooting at Mother Emanuel Church in first 2019 Sunset Series event

We Are Charleston authors Dr. Bernard E. Powers Jr.,
Marjory Wentworth and Herb Frazier.
ASHEBORO -- On the night of June 17, 2015, a 21-year-old white supremacist shot and killed nine African-American churchgoers and wounded five others during a prayer meeting at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina.

A year later, a journalist, a historian and a poet, all with deep ties to the city, published We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel. The three — Herb Frazier, Dr. Bernard E. Powers Jr. and Marjory Wentworth —will share their thoughts and reflections in the first installment of the 2019 Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series at 7 p.m. Saturday, January 26, in downtown Asheboro’s historic Sunset Theatre.

The event, sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, is free and the public is invited.

Frazier has edited and reported for five daily newspapers in the South, including the Post and Courier in Charleston, his hometown. He currently serves as marketing and public relations manager for Magnolia Plantation and Gardens near Charleston.

Powers is a history professor at the College of Charleston, where he teaches United States and African American history. He has appeared in productions for PBS including The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross and Slavery and the Making of America.

Wentworth is Poet Laureate of South Carolina. A  five-time nominee for the Pushcart Prize in poetry, she is author of five collections of poetry and the acclaimed children’s book Shackles.

We Are Charleston explores not only the shooting, its aftermath and its ramifications, but also the history of slavery and racism in Charleston, and the importance of the AME denominational movement in the fight for freedom and civil rights. The book also delves into the impact of the shooting on the loved ones of those killed and wounded, focusing on the nature of forgiveness and the religious mandate to forgive — a fraught subject in the face of the evil acts of the young murderer.

Also slated for the 2019 Signature Series:
  • Musician Jim Avett, 7 p.m. Friday, March 15;
  • Author Jerry Bledsoe, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 2;
  • UNC basketball titan Eric Montross, 7 p.m. Saturday, September 21.