Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Explore Southern cuisine in Asheboro library talk

John J. Beck
ASHEBORO – Southern cuisine is a blend of the traditions and ingredients of three cultures: Native Americans, British settlers, and people from west and central Africa. 

Elon University history professor Dr. John J. Beck will explore how those influences merged to form a common cuisine — though with many variations — from Virginia to Texas in “Southern Cooking, High and Low: A Short History of the Cuisine of the South,” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 14, at the Asheboro library.

Beck’s talk, sponsored by the library’s Margaret C. Taylor Memorial Culinary Arts Collection, is free and the public is invited.

Beck notes that traditional Southern fare was created and cooked at home rather than fostered by restaurants — whether in the houses of affluent families by African American women before and after the Civil War, or for the social events of less well-to-do people, such as church picnics, wakes and family reunions.

Now Southern food is being taken in new directions by professional chefs who approach the cuisine with the same reverence that they have treated French and other celebrated cooking traditions.

Beck holds a Ph.D. in American history from UNC-Chapel Hill with a specialty in Southern history. He is co-author of Southern Culture: An Introduction and is currently working on a history of Southern food.

He retired from a career in the North Carolina Community College System, last serving as Dean of Arts and Sciences at Granville Community College.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Find immigrant ancestors in Asheboro library genealogy class

ASHEBORO -- Track down your forebears who traveled to America from other countries in “Finding Your Immigrant Ancestors,” 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, August 9, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer will cover the basics about immigrants to the United States from the 18th through the 20th centuries, and sources where records about them can be found.

The class is free and open to the public.

Because establishing a timeline is one of the best ways to get started, participants will learn how to determine when their families came to America from sources including passenger lists from ships docking at U.S. ports, census and naturalization records and in some cases passport applications.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6815.

‘Traveling Bone Show’ visits Asheboro library

ASHEBORO -- Test your anthropological knowledge in “The Traveling Bone Show” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 7, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The all-ages event, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Julia Loreth, a biology lecturer at UNC-Greensboro, will bring along both real and model skulls of various species to demonstrate how to identify creatures by their teeth and bones, and how the skulls  can help determine gender.

Loreth is co-coordinator for the Regional North Carolina Science Olympiad Tournament, and works with the City of Greensboro’s Elementary School Adopt-a-Stream program.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, July 19, 2018

‘Bluegrass Rocks’ as singer-songwriter Charles Pettee visits Asheboro library

Charles Pettee

ASHEBORO – “Bluegrass Rocks” as singer song/writer Charles Pettee presents “Hear the Sound,” an interactive family music show, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 26, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Pettee’s appearance, which is free and open to the public, is part of “Libraries Rock,” the Randolph County Public Library’s summer reading initiative. It is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

Pettee is an accomplished guitarist, mandolin player and songwriter, and founder of the popular, Chapel Hill-based bluegrass group The Shady Grove Band.

In “Hear the Sound,” he uses the banjo, harmonica guitar, mandolin, his voice, and a variety of hats to introduce audiences to the tapestry of sounds that make up the music of the Carolinas: the music of the early settlers, native Americans, African Americans, Piedmont Blues, gospel and bluegrass.

There’s never a dull moment as Pettee switches songs or hats, encouraging audience participation and spontaneous discussion throughout the show.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Master Illusionist Caleb Sigmon to rock Randolph libraries in July

Master illusionist and storyteller Caleb Sigmon
ASHEBORO – Master illusionist Caleb Sigmon will appear at all seven Randolph County Public Library locations in July as “Libraries Rock,” the library’s summer reading initiative, continues.

Sigmon brings an inspirational, high-energy approach to his one-of-a-kind illusion show, which is filled with magic, stories and interactive audience participation

He will bring his unique blend of magic and storytelling to each library as follows:

Archdale, 2 p.m. Thursday, July 19;
Asheboro, 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 16;
Franklinville, 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 16;
Liberty, 2 p.m. Monday, July 16;
Ramseur, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 17 (at the Ramseur Municipal Building)
Randleman, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 19;
Seagrove, 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 17.

The month also will feature “Animal Sound Bites” with the NC Zoo at Asheboro, Archdale and Seagrove. This unique event focuses on what animals are saying with their sounds; participants will even meet a few live animals. Randleman will host “Snakes Alive” with Ron Cromer.

Asheboro will present “Didgeridoo Down Under,” a fusion of Australia-themed music, culture, science, comedy and audience participation, and “Bluegrass Rocks,” featuring singer/songwriter Charles Pettee. Finale events at Archdale and Asheboro will showcase the “Balloon Magic” of Clark Sides, while Liberty hosts a “Last Day Luau.”

There’s more; visit www.randolphlibrary.org/summer for full schedules, drop by your local library, or call 336-318-6804.

The Summer Reading Program is sponsored by Friends of the Randolph County Public Library with support from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. It’s part of a national effort to keep children reading during the break from school; research shows that kids who read during the summer do better in school the next year.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Historian tells tales of notable North Carolina women in Asheboro library talk

Randell Jones
ASHEBORO – A woman disguised as a Civil War soldier. A couple of famous pirates. A daredevil aeronaut. An internationally famous sharpshooter. And a first lady who “really, really, really” liked being married to the governor.

Award-winning author and storyteller Randell Jones will talk about theses notable North Carolina woman and others in “Famous and Infamous Women of North Carolina” at 6;30 p.m. Tuesday, July 10, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Jones’s talk is a lighthearted look at some serious history — the roles and accomplishments of a few notable women, among so many — in whom we can all take pride as being part of the fabric which makes North Carolina so special.

His talk is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. It’s free and the public is invited.

Jones is author of In the Footsteps of Daniel Boone and Scoundrels, Rogues and Heroes of the Old North State, among other books. In 2013, he received the History Award Medal from the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and has received two Kentucky History Awards from the Kentucky History Society.

The library is located at201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.




Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Author Chip Womick to debut second children’s book at Asheboro library

Chip Womick
ASHEBORO – Local author and journalist Chip Womick will debut his second children’s book, Phantom Fishing with Gramps, in a storytime and talk at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 12, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Womick’s appearance is free and the public is invited. A fun, hands-on activity for children will follow his talk.

Phantom Fishing with Gramps is the second collaboration between Womick and Argentinian illustrator Marina Saumell, following 2016’s Mrs. McGillicutty’s Last Sunflower. It was released in May by PeaceLight Press.

The story follows a young girl who goes fishing with her grandfather on her birthday. They have a picnic, dig for fishing worms, and experience the sights and sounds of the forest as they walk a path to the pond, where they uncover the mystery of the phantom fish.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.



Musician to bring Irish tunes to Asheboro library


ASHEBORO – Hear some fine Irish tunes and learn about the country’s music in “An International Musical Journey: Trip to Ireland,” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 18, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The performance will feature musician Travis Hicks, who will play traditional Irish music including jigs, reels, hornpipes and slow airs on traditional hand-crafted instruments. With 18 years' experience on the Irish whistles and bagpipes, Hicks will demonstrate the nuances of the Irish pipes, tin whistle, and Anglo concertina in the Irish tradition.

The concert, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited. A question and answer session will follow the musical demonstration.

Irish music is an avocation for Hicks, who is an assistant professor of interior architecture at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and director of the Center for Community-Engaged Design.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Libraries Rock during Asheboro library Summer Reading


ASHEBORO – Music, magic, movies, stilts, spoons, snakes, stories, science, didgeridoos – and reading – all will be part of “Libraries Rock,” the Randolph County Public Library’s 2018 Summer Reading Program, kicking off in June with family musician Alina Celeste at all seven libraries, and over 200 more performances, storytimes, hands-on activities and other events for children, teens and adults.

The initiative runs during June and July (and in some cases into August) at the Archdale, Asheboro, Franklinville, Liberty, Ramseur, Randleman and Seagrove libraries. The library’s Extension Services department also will bring Summer Reading activities to children in day cares, at school system summer lunch sites and other locations, such as Our Daily Bread.

During the summer, children can sign up to track minutes or books read in return for reading rewards. Last year, local children ages 0 thru 12th grade and their families checked out over 60,000 books and reported reading for more than 999,700 minutes.

Teens and adults can get in on the act too, and keep track of their summer reading for chances to win prizes or recognition.

Full schedules and details can be found at www.randolphlibrary.org/summer or at your local library.

Asheboro will host a Summer Reading Carnival at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 9, with stilt-walking juggler Sky-High Skyler and other fun activities. Liberty’s Opening Celebration, 2-4 p.m. Friday, June 8, will feature aerialist Amanda Finch, carnival-inspired games and local band Oldskool.

Randleman’s kickoff at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, June 7, will feature Macon’s Martial Arts and ice cream.

Celeste will present “Canta y Baila (Sing and Dance) with Alina Celeste” at each library in June. Alina’s shows are a joyous blend of parent-friendly sing-alongs, dance-alongs featuring her original tunes as well as classic folk songs for kids from the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America.

She will appear at the libraries as follows: 
  • Archdale: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 20;
  • Asheboro: 2 p.m. Monday, June 18;
  • Franklinville: 10:30 a.m. Monday, June 18;
  • Liberty: 11:30 a.m. Friday, June 22;
  • Randleman: 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 20;
  • Ramseur: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 19;
  • Seagrove: 1 p.m. Tuesday, June 19.

 In July, Master Illusionist and Storyteller Caleb Sigmon will bring his unique combination of magic, amazement and laughter to all the libraries.

In between, the libraries will offer a range of weekly storytimes, performances and other activities. Percussive performer The Spoon Man, and  Didgeridoo Down Under, a unique fusion of Australia-themed music and environmental awareness, will visit Archdale, Asheboro and Randleman.

The Archdale, Asheboro and Seagrove libraries will host the NC Zoo’s Animal Sound Bites, featuring some live ones! If snakes are your thing, “Snakes Alive” will visit Randleman, and the CCSB Reptile Rescue will drop by Liberty.

Teens can take art classes in Asheboro, make pottery in Archdale, dig for fossils in Randleman or “#hangout” in Liberty. Adults can learn about Irish music, famous (and infamous) women of North Carolina, “Food that Rocks,” computers, and more.

The Summer Reading Program is sponsored by Friends of the Randolph County Public Library with support from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. It’s part of a national effort to keep children reading during the break from school; research shows that kids who read during the summer do better in school the next year.

7-week Asheboro library summer program to help kids get ready for kindergarten


ASHEBORO – Children who are entering kindergarten this fall, but who have not attended preschool, will have a chance to prepare for their new school experience in “1, 2, 3. A, B, C. Let’s Get Ready for Kindergarten!” this summer at the Asheboro Public Library.

The free, seven-week program, which will meet from 10-11 a.m. Wednesdays from June 6-July 25, will focus on the basics kids need to be successful in kindergarten. Participants will learn about letters, numbers and shapes as well as important behavioral skills such as taking turns, walking in line and sharing.

Participants also will develop their fine motor skills as they learn to use scissors and pencils.

Parents will receive a checklist of activities they can work on with their children during the weeks before school starts.

Registration is required; call 336-318-6804 to sign up or for more information, or visit the Children’s Room. The library is located at 201 Worth Street.

“1, 2, 3. A, B, C. Let’s Get Ready for Kindergarten!” is part of “Libraries Rock,” the Randolph County Public Library’s Summer Reading Program. For more information on all the other exciting events planned throughout the summer, visit www.randolphlibrary.org/summer or pick up a schedule at your local library.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Titanic stories, memorabilia to sail into Asheboro library in “Ship of Dreams” talk

ASHEBORO – Hear some of the 2,228 stories of people aboard the Titanic and view memorabilia from the ill-fated ocean liner, in “Titanic: Ship of Dreams,” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 17, at the Asheboro library.

Belmont Abbey College professor Dr. Melinda E. Ratchford will present a glimpse into the world of 1912 and the amazing people who boarded the most luxurious and largest ship in the world, and sailed into immortality.

Ratchford, who has visited locations associated with the ship — including Belfast, Southampton and the sinking site in the North Atlantic — also will show off her extensive collection of Titanic memorabilia.

Her talk is free and the public is invited. It is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Meet Robert Burke Warren as author in Asheboro library talk

Robert Burke Warren

ASHEBORO – After you meet Robert Burke Warren as musician during his wife Holly George-Warren's Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series talk on May 3, meet Robert Burke Warren as author in a talk featuring his novel "Perfectly Broken," 10 a.m. Saturday, May 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

His appearance, sponsored by the Friends of the Library and the Randolph County Public Library, is free and the public is invited.

"Perfectly Broken" follows the journey of a former musician who moves with his wife and young son from a New York City apartment to a Catskills farmhouse only to face drastic changes in their marriage, friendships and family.

Warren grew up in Atlanta before becoming a working musician in New York. He played bass with the iconic garage band The Fleshtones and performed the title role in the UK/West End production of the musical "The Buddy Holly Story."

He's a singer-songwriter mentored by Rosanne Cash, and has had a successful career as a children's performer, "Uncle Rock."

His writing has appeared in Paste, Salon and numerous other publications. "Perfectly Broken" was published in 2016.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Asheboro’s Sunset Series to feature music journalist Holly George-Warren

Holly George-Warren
ASHEBORO – One of the country’s most acclaimed and prolific music journalists, Holly George-Warren, will talk about her adventures interviewing and profiling such legendary figures as Johnny Cash and Tom Petty, and writing full-length biographies of Gene Autry, Alex Chilton and Janis Joplin, in “Alex, Gene and Janis: Holly George-Warren and the art of Pop Culture Biography” at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, at downtown Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre.

Her appearance is the third installment of the Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library. The event is free and the public is invited.

Robert Burke Warren
George-Warren’s talk will be “annotated” by songs associated with the artist she’s discussing, performed by her husband, musician Robert Burke Warren.

Now a freelance writer and adjunct professor of arts journalism at the State University of New York at New Paltz, George-Warren grew up in Asheboro. Her mother, Martha George, was a beloved longtime librarian; her father, Alvis George Jr., designed the award-winning 1964 Asheboro Public Library building and its 1994 expansion.

In 1970s Asheboro, George-Warren immersed herself in all things rock ‘n’ roll, seeking the latest music, traveling to concerts and learning everything she could. In college, she decided to turn her love of music into a career, and headed for the New York scene.

Since then, she has authored 10 books (three of them children’s books) and co-authored more than 30 others. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, Entertainment Weekly and many other publications.

Of Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life and Time of Gene Autry, the New York Times said, “Every celebrity could use a biographer like Holly George-Warren.”

She also served as editor of Rolling Stone Press, where she oversaw such projects as The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, The Rolling Stone Illustrate History of Rock & Roll and the Rolling Stone Album Guide.

She received Grammy nominations for co-producing a 5-CD box set, R-E-S-P-E-C-T: A Century of Women in Music,  and for penning liner notes to Janis Joplin’s The Pearl Sessions album.

George-Warren also is a sought-after commentator for television documentaries on topics including music, pop culture and Western Americana, and has served as a consultant, writer and lecturer at museums and academic institutions.

Robert Burke Warren is an accomplished musician who played bass with the iconic garage band The Fleshtones, and performed the title role in the UK/West End production of the musical The Buddy Holly Story. He’s a singer-songwriter mentored by Rosanne Cash, and has had a successful career as children’s performer “Uncle Rock.”

He also is a writer, with work appearing in Paste, Salon and other publication. In 2016 he published his first novel, Perfectly Broken.

While in town for the Sunset Series event, he will present a reading from his book at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau at 800-626-2672.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Asheboro library, Genealogical Society, to offer family research workshops in April


ASHEBORO – Learn  about online genealogy research at the Asheboro Public Library in April, and find out about DNA testing during the Randolph County Genealogical Society’s Spring Workshop, also at the Asheboro library.

The library classes, led by librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer, will feature the two library-provided electronic genealogy resources, Ancestry Library Edition and Heritage Quest.

In “Using Ancestry.com Library Edition,” 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, April 12, participants can get hands-on to learn the basics of using Ancestry.com, the world’s most-used database for researching family history. The class will explore the major features of Ancestry, plus tips on how to search more effectively.

It also will cover the differences between Ancestry Library Edition, which is available for in-house use at any Randolph County Public Library location, and the subscription version, Ancestry.com. Also covered will be how to send discoveries to your email.

In “Using Heritage Quest,” 6:30-8  p.m. Thursday, April 26, participants will learn how to discover the unique information available through Heritage Quest. This database, while not as broad as Ancestry.com, can be accessed from home or anywhere there’s an Internet connection with your library card or student ID.

A limited number of library laptops is available for each class, so registration is required; participants can bring their own laptops as well. To sign up, call 336-318-6803.

The Randolph County Genealogy Society will explore the use of DNA for genealogy in its spring workshop, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, April 21, at the Asheboro library. The presenter will be Larry Cates, librarian at the High Point Public Library’s Heritage Research Center.

Participants can register for giveaway of a free DNA kit (you must be present to win). Seating is limited to the first 50 arrivals.

A Genealogical Society membership meeting to elect new board members will follow.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6815.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Randolph library Friends to host ‘Trivia on Tap’ fundraiser at Four Saints Brewing Company

ASHEBORO – Test  your knowledge of books, movies, music and local history as the Friends of the Library’s ‘Trivia on Tap’ fundraiser returns for a second year at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 23, at Four Saints Brewing Company.

Tickets, which are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance, are available at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street. Food is included in the cost of admission.

Proceeds support Friends projects including Books for Babies, author visits, musical performances and other cultural events; and library programming for children, teens and adults.

During the friendly competition, Trivia Master Rich Powell will present an evening of general knowledge trivia. Participants will answer three rounds of trivia questions in teams of any number.

Participants may gather a team beforehand, or simply join a team on arrival.

The winning team will have bragging rights and team members’ names will be added to the Friends of the Library Trivia plaque.

There will be a cash bar. Four Saints is located at 218 S. Fayetteville Street in Asheboro.

For further information, call 336-318-6801.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Learn how African American band from NC helped integrate the U.S. Navy in Asheboro library talk

B-1 Band veteran Calvin Morrow
(photo by Eddie Price
Photography).
ASHEBORO --Learn how an African American band in World War II propelled the U.S. Navy towards inclusiveness — and meet one of the musicians — during a talk by East Carolina University professor Alex Albright at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 17, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Albright will be joined by Calvin Morrow of Greensboro, who played French horn in the band. Their appearance, entitled, “B-1: How NC A&T and UNC Integrated the Modern U.S. Navy,” is sponsored by the library’s Robert C. Taylor Jr. Memorial World War II Collection.

It’s free and the public is invited.

The 45-piece B-1 Band, comprised primarily of N.C. A&T students, was assigned to support the Navy’s preflight training school on the then-segregated UNC campus in Chapel Hill. Band members were the first African Americans to serve in the Navy at a general rating, placing them on a par with white sailors.

As such, they also were the first black people to work on-campus in a non-servant capacity. They were a sign of hope among members of Chapel Hill’s African American community, who lined the streets to watch the band march to work from segregated living quarters.

In May 1944, the band was transferred to Pearl Harbor, where its members were among the largest posting of African American sailors in the world.

Albright will explore the unit’s history with images and documents, and musical recordings made while the band was stationed in Hawaii.

He also will delve into the history of blacks and musicians in the U.S. military, and talk about the complicated racial dynamic of the era in North Carolina.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803 

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Randolph library Friends to host golfing great Jim Dodson

Jim Dodson
ASHEBORO – Popular sportswriter Jim Dodson will talk about his newest book, The Range Bucket List, in “An Evening with Golfing Great Jim Dodson” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, at Pinewood Country Club.

Tickets for Dodson’s appearance, which is sponsored by the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, are $35 per person and can be purchased at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street. Heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served and there will be a cash bar.

In his 40-year career as a journalist, Dodson has gained international renown for his books on golfing. The Range Bucket List, published in 2017, is a funny, intimate, nostalgic journey of self and sport in which this legendary author completes his golf “bucket list.”

Dodson’s previous books include Final Rounds; Ben Hogan: An American Life; American Triumverate: Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, Ben Hogan and the Age of Modern Golf, which won the U.S. Golf Association’s Herbert Warren Wind Award in 2012; A Golfer’s Life with Arnold Palmer; and A Son of the Game, which was named Top Golf Book of the Year by the International Network of Golf.

In 2011, Dodson won the prestigious Donald Ross Award, given annually by the American Society of Golf Course Architects — only one of two golf writers to receive the award. He is also a recipient of North Carolina’s highest honor, the Order of the Long Leaf Pine.

Dodson and his wife Wendy live in Greensboro.

For further information, call the Asheboro Public Library at 336-318-6801.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Historian Kevin Duffus returns to Asheboro library with tales of Outer Banks shipwrecks

Kevin P. Duffus
ASHEBORO – For more than 450 years, shipwrecks shaped the destiny of North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

Researcher Kevin Duffus will return to the Asheboro Public Library at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, to explore how these incidents created one of the most intriguing histories and cultures in America. His talk is free and the public is invited.

Duffus, author of the 2007 book Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks: An Illustrated Guide, will present a wide-ranging discussion of shipwrecks and their legacies, including lifesaving, rumors of wreckers, and hundreds of forgotten shipwreck victims buried among the dunes.

He will explain the various causes of wrecks, why there is a “Graveyard of the Atlantic” in the first place, what it was like for passengers and crews when ships crashed into the breakers along the banks, and the true stories of some of the most incredible rescues.

Duffus will share the memories of the last living lighthouse keeper on the Outer Banks, the descendants of lifesavers, and residents who played on the decks of a wrecked vessel as children  — and one historian who danced there.

He also will point audience members to the best places to see remains of the derelict ships.

Duffus is an award-winning author, researcher, historian and filmmaker who has made significant discoveries about North Carolina history. His books include The Lost Light: A Civil War Mystery, about his recovery of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse’s missing lens; War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast; and The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate, in which he dispels myths about the notorious buccaneer and uncovers the nature of Black Beard’s treasure.

His appearance is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Abby the Spoon Lady to bring street performance to Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre

Abby the Spoon Lady by John Gellman
ASHEBORO – Asheville street performer Abby the Spoon Lady, and her one-man-band friend Chris Rodrigues, will bring their unique mix of music and storytelling to downtown Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 17.

The performance is free and the public is invited. It is part of the Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series, sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library.

“I fell into both street performance and spoon playing when I started backpacking across the United States,” Abby says. “I became obsessed with folk rhythm and culture, and the stories surrounding.”

She found a rich street performance scene in Asheville and established herself there. She shares the street with Chris Rodrigues, who plays guitar and harmonica while stomping on a suitcase with one foot and tapping on a license plate with the other. The two became best friends and performing partners. They began touring more conventional venues, to often sell-out crowds.

Abby hosts the Busker Broadcast radio show on Asheville FM 101.3.  She also serves as acting president of the Asheville Buskers Collective, founded in 2014 to ensure that street performance remains legal.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information about Abby’s appearance, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, 800-626-2672.

Following Abby, the series will include two more events.

Asheboro native Holly George-Warren will take the stage at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3. One of the country’s foremost music journalists, George-Warren is most recently author of the biographies A Man Called Destruction: The Life of Alex Chilton, from Box Tops to Big Star to Backdoor Man, and Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life and Times of Gene Autry. She is currently working on a biography of Janis Joplin.

Her husband, author and musician Robert Burke Warren, will play music as a soundtrack for her talk.

Journalist Kevin Maurer, who has been embedded with various U.S. military forces since the beginning of the war in Iraq, will appear at 7 p.m. Thursday, September 13. He is author of No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama Bin Laden, which was the top-selling hardcover book of 2012.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Author Charlie Lovett to delve into Holy Grail mystery at Friends of the Library dessert event

Charlie Lovett

ASHEBORO -- New York Times bestselling author Charlie Lovett will spill secrets of the Holy Grail during a Friends of the Randolph County Public Library dessert reception at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, at The Table Farmhouse Bakery in Asheboro.

Seating for the event is limited; tickets are $6 and must be purchased in advance at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street.

In his 2017 novel The Lost Book of the Grail, now being released in paperback, Lovett follows British bibliophile Arthur Prescott and  American researcher Bethany Davis as they uncover tantalizing clues to the location — and nature — of the Grail in a small cathedral town in the English countryside.

Lovett is also author of the novels The Bookman’s Tale, about an investigation spurred by a photo discovered in a book found in a used and rare bookshop, and First Impressions, a mystery involving writer Jane Austen.

He has penned five books on Lewis Carroll, and has lectured internationally on the author. For the 150th anniversary in 2015 of the publication of Alice in Wonderland, he wrote the introduction to a new Penguin Books edition of the work and curated a major exhibition of Carroll artifacts and memorabilia — many of them from his own collection — at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center.

Lovett is also author of plays for children and a novel for  teens. A Winston-Salem native, he is a graduate of Davidson College and the Vermont College of Fine Arts.

He and his family divide their time between Winston-Salem and the village of Kingham in Oxfordshire, England.

For further information, call 336-318-6801.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Meet Llama Llama at Asheboro library


ASHEBORO – Llama Llama, the character from the popular series of children books by Anna Dewdney, will visit the Asheboro Public Library at 4 p.m. Friday, March 2, to help celebrate Read Across America Day.

The event will feature Llama Llama stories, related games and crafts, and a photo opportunity with Llama Llama. It’s free; children and their families are invited.

Read Across America, sponsored by the National Education Association, is an annual event to celebrate reading on the March 2 birthday of Dr. Seuss.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6804 for further information.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

New Asheboro library genealogy classes to cover census, Ancestry.com


ASHEBORO – A new round of workshops for family researchers with librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer will take place in March at the Asheboro Public Library.

The classes, covering census records and Ancestry.com, are free and the public is invited (some of the workshops require registration). The classes are:
              
Making Sense of the Census, 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, March 8. Census records contain important information about individuals and families.  No other source can place people in a certain place at a certain time or provide details over many decades.

Each census record from 1790-1940 is different.  Learn what is unique about the census records from 1790-1940 and how it will benefit your search for ancestors. No registration is required.

Using Ancestry.com Library Edition, 2-3:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 13. Learn the basics of using Ancestry.com, the world’s leading database for researching family history. The workshop will explore the major features of Ancestry, plus provide tips on how to search more effectively. Ancestry Library Edition is available to use free of charge at any Randolph County Library.

The class also will cover differences between Ancestry Library Edition and the subscription version, and how to send your discoveries to your email account. Because a limited number of laptops is available for the class, registration is required; call 336-318-6803 to sign up. You may also bring your own laptop.

Finding Census Records On-line, 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, March 22. Learn how to use computers to search Ancestry Library Edition and Heritage Quest to view actual census images to find information about your ancestors. Explore effective search methods for both federal and state census records and learn how to read between the lines for additional information.

Because a limited number of laptops is available for the class, registration is required; call 336-318-6803 to sign up. You may also bring your own laptop.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Historian to explore NC slave narratives in Asheboro library talk


ASHEBORO – Three courageous African American North Carolinians who escaped slavery put pen to paper to describe their experiences.

Researcher Laurel C. Sneed will share their stories in “Beyond 12 Years A Slave: The Influential Slave Narratives of Tar Heels Moses Roper, Harriet Jacobs, and William H. Singleton” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The talk, part of the North Carolina Humanities Council’s Road Scholar program, is free and the public is invited.

Sneed will examine how the three authors — Roper from Caswell County, Jacobs from Edenton and Singleton from New Bern — left their mark on the slave narrative literary tradition. The mission of slave narratives was to persuade readers to support the anti-slavery agenda.  She also will discuss the veracity of the narratives, which often are dismissed as propaganda, and compare the North Carolina writings to Solomon Northrop’s  12 Years A Slave.

Based in Durham, Sneed is an educator, researcher and filmmaker. In 1995, her research helped uncover the origins of famed Caswell County cabinetmaker Thomas Day. Since then she has produced a broad range of materials on Day as well as on other African American historical topics.

Her visit is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

‘Candid Critters’ cameras return to Randolph library



A deer captured with a Candid Critters camera in Randolph County in May.
(This work is licensed under a
  CreativeCommons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 InternationalLicense.)
ASHEBORO – Wildlife cameras from the “North Carolina’s Candid Critters” initiative have returned to the Randolph County Public Library and are again available for check out.

Candid Critters, a state sponsored wildlife study, makes cameras available through public libraries. Participants check out the camera to mount on their property or on public land, and weeks later retrieve the images for viewing and uploading.

Cameras were available at the library from January-August, but were moved to other areas of the state in the fall for deer tracking.

Anyone interested in checking out a camera must first register at NCCandidCritters.org. Participants will receive an invitation to complete an online training course.

Library staff will be notified by the Candid Critters organization when a person is approved, and will contact the person to arrange checkout of a camera.

Those who completed the sign-up process previously can check out or reserve a camera by calling 338-318-6803 or by visiting the library. Library staff is available to assist with uploading images to the Candid Critters website.

Data will be used to map trends in animal populations across the state. See images from around the state, including Randolph County cameras, at www.tinyurl.com/candcrit.

Candid Critters is a partnership among NC State University, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, the State Library of NC, NC Cardinal, the state’s public libraries and the Smithsonian Institution.

For more information, call the library at 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

History prof to explore Vietnamese culture in Asheboro library talk


ASHEBORO – In the eyes of many Americans, there is little separation between the image of “Vietnam” and the tragic outcome of U.S. involvement in the war.

But Vietnam as a nation, and the Vietnamese people, have existed in the region for over 2,000 years.

UNC-Greensboro history professor Dr. James Anderson will talk about the country, its people and its traditions in “Vietnamese Culture: Beyond the War” at
6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 15, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Anderson will introduce various aspects of modern Vietnamese society and culture, with a focus on preserving traditions during the country’s emergence from its war-torn past.

His talk is free and the public is invited. It is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

Anderson is head of the History Department at UNCG. He holds masters and Ph.D degrees from the University of Washington, and a B.A. from Harvard University. His fields of study include imperial and modern China, east Asia and Southeast Asia.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Learn about new online test prep resource in Asheboro library class


ASHEBORO – Taking a standardized test for school, work or citizenship?

Learn about the Randolph County Public Library’s new online test preparation resource, the Testing and Educational Reference Center, in “Getting to Know TERC,” 4  p.m. Thursday, February 15, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The TERC provides an interactive learning experience that includes full-length timed practice exams for academic tests such as the SAT, ACT, GED, GRE and others. It also includes professional tests such as the ASVAB (military), NCLEX (nursing), LSAT (law) and Praxis (teaching), as well as resources for college planning, financial aid and career development.

The free class will cover getting started, the tests covered, and the different kinds of help available via the TERC.

The class is focused on teens but all ages are invited.

The TERC is provided to cardholders in the state’s public, community college, university system and independent/private college libraries by NC LIVE, the state’s online library of electronic resources.

The Asheboro library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803.