Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Meet Robert Burke Warren as author in Asheboro library talk

Robert Burke Warren

ASHEBORO – After you meet Robert Burke Warren as musician during his wife Holly George-Warren's Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series talk on May 3, meet Robert Burke Warren as author in a talk featuring his novel "Perfectly Broken," 10 a.m. Saturday, May 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

His appearance, sponsored by the Friends of the Library and the Randolph County Public Library, is free and the public is invited.

"Perfectly Broken" follows the journey of a former musician who moves with his wife and young son from a New York City apartment to a Catskills farmhouse only to face drastic changes in their marriage, friendships and family.

Warren grew up in Atlanta before becoming a working musician in New York. He played bass with the iconic garage band The Fleshtones and performed the title role in the UK/West End production of the musical "The Buddy Holly Story."

He's a singer-songwriter mentored by Rosanne Cash, and has had a successful career as a children's performer, "Uncle Rock."

His writing has appeared in Paste, Salon and numerous other publications. "Perfectly Broken" was published in 2016.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Asheboro’s Sunset Series to feature music journalist Holly George-Warren

Holly George-Warren
ASHEBORO – One of the country’s most acclaimed and prolific music journalists, Holly George-Warren, will talk about her adventures interviewing and profiling such legendary figures as Johnny Cash and Tom Petty, and writing full-length biographies of Gene Autry, Alex Chilton and Janis Joplin, in “Alex, Gene and Janis: Holly George-Warren and the art of Pop Culture Biography” at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, at downtown Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre.

Her appearance is the third installment of the Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library. The event is free and the public is invited.

Robert Burke Warren
George-Warren’s talk will be “annotated” by songs associated with the artist she’s discussing, performed by her husband, musician Robert Burke Warren.

Now a freelance writer and adjunct professor of arts journalism at the State University of New York at New Paltz, George-Warren grew up in Asheboro. Her mother, Martha George, was a beloved longtime librarian; her father, Alvis George Jr., designed the award-winning 1964 Asheboro Public Library building and its 1994 expansion.

In 1970s Asheboro, George-Warren immersed herself in all things rock ‘n’ roll, seeking the latest music, traveling to concerts and learning everything she could. In college, she decided to turn her love of music into a career, and headed for the New York scene.

Since then, she has authored 10 books (three of them children’s books) and co-authored more than 30 others. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, Entertainment Weekly and many other publications.

Of Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life and Time of Gene Autry, the New York Times said, “Every celebrity could use a biographer like Holly George-Warren.”

She also served as editor of Rolling Stone Press, where she oversaw such projects as The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, The Rolling Stone Illustrate History of Rock & Roll and the Rolling Stone Album Guide.

She received Grammy nominations for co-producing a 5-CD box set, R-E-S-P-E-C-T: A Century of Women in Music,  and for penning liner notes to Janis Joplin’s The Pearl Sessions album.

George-Warren also is a sought-after commentator for television documentaries on topics including music, pop culture and Western Americana, and has served as a consultant, writer and lecturer at museums and academic institutions.

Robert Burke Warren is an accomplished musician who played bass with the iconic garage band The Fleshtones, and performed the title role in the UK/West End production of the musical The Buddy Holly Story. He’s a singer-songwriter mentored by Rosanne Cash, and has had a successful career as children’s performer “Uncle Rock.”

He also is a writer, with work appearing in Paste, Salon and other publication. In 2016 he published his first novel, Perfectly Broken.

While in town for the Sunset Series event, he will present a reading from his book at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau at 800-626-2672.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Asheboro library, Genealogical Society, to offer family research workshops in April


ASHEBORO – Learn  about online genealogy research at the Asheboro Public Library in April, and find out about DNA testing during the Randolph County Genealogical Society’s Spring Workshop, also at the Asheboro library.

The library classes, led by librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer, will feature the two library-provided electronic genealogy resources, Ancestry Library Edition and Heritage Quest.

In “Using Ancestry.com Library Edition,” 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, April 12, participants can get hands-on to learn the basics of using Ancestry.com, the world’s most-used database for researching family history. The class will explore the major features of Ancestry, plus tips on how to search more effectively.

It also will cover the differences between Ancestry Library Edition, which is available for in-house use at any Randolph County Public Library location, and the subscription version, Ancestry.com. Also covered will be how to send discoveries to your email.

In “Using Heritage Quest,” 6:30-8  p.m. Thursday, April 26, participants will learn how to discover the unique information available through Heritage Quest. This database, while not as broad as Ancestry.com, can be accessed from home or anywhere there’s an Internet connection with your library card or student ID.

A limited number of library laptops is available for each class, so registration is required; participants can bring their own laptops as well. To sign up, call 336-318-6803.

The Randolph County Genealogy Society will explore the use of DNA for genealogy in its spring workshop, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, April 21, at the Asheboro library. The presenter will be Larry Cates, librarian at the High Point Public Library’s Heritage Research Center.

Participants can register for giveaway of a free DNA kit (you must be present to win). Seating is limited to the first 50 arrivals.

A Genealogical Society membership meeting to elect new board members will follow.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6815.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Randolph library Friends to host ‘Trivia on Tap’ fundraiser at Four Saints Brewing Company

ASHEBORO – Test  your knowledge of books, movies, music and local history as the Friends of the Library’s ‘Trivia on Tap’ fundraiser returns for a second year at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 23, at Four Saints Brewing Company.

Tickets, which are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance, are available at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street. Food is included in the cost of admission.

Proceeds support Friends projects including Books for Babies, author visits, musical performances and other cultural events; and library programming for children, teens and adults.

During the friendly competition, Trivia Master Rich Powell will present an evening of general knowledge trivia. Participants will answer three rounds of trivia questions in teams of any number.

Participants may gather a team beforehand, or simply join a team on arrival.

The winning team will have bragging rights and team members’ names will be added to the Friends of the Library Trivia plaque.

There will be a cash bar. Four Saints is located at 218 S. Fayetteville Street in Asheboro.

For further information, call 336-318-6801.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Learn how African American band from NC helped integrate the U.S. Navy in Asheboro library talk

B-1 Band veteran Calvin Morrow
(photo by Eddie Price
Photography).
ASHEBORO --Learn how an African American band in World War II propelled the U.S. Navy towards inclusiveness — and meet one of the musicians — during a talk by East Carolina University professor Alex Albright at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 17, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Albright will be joined by Calvin Morrow of Greensboro, who played French horn in the band. Their appearance, entitled, “B-1: How NC A&T and UNC Integrated the Modern U.S. Navy,” is sponsored by the library’s Robert C. Taylor Jr. Memorial World War II Collection.

It’s free and the public is invited.

The 45-piece B-1 Band, comprised primarily of N.C. A&T students, was assigned to support the Navy’s preflight training school on the then-segregated UNC campus in Chapel Hill. Band members were the first African Americans to serve in the Navy at a general rating, placing them on a par with white sailors.

As such, they also were the first black people to work on-campus in a non-servant capacity. They were a sign of hope among members of Chapel Hill’s African American community, who lined the streets to watch the band march to work from segregated living quarters.

In May 1944, the band was transferred to Pearl Harbor, where its members were among the largest posting of African American sailors in the world.

Albright will explore the unit’s history with images and documents, and musical recordings made while the band was stationed in Hawaii.

He also will delve into the history of blacks and musicians in the U.S. military, and talk about the complicated racial dynamic of the era in North Carolina.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803 

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Randolph library Friends to host golfing great Jim Dodson

Jim Dodson
ASHEBORO – Popular sportswriter Jim Dodson will talk about his newest book, The Range Bucket List, in “An Evening with Golfing Great Jim Dodson” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, at Pinewood Country Club.

Tickets for Dodson’s appearance, which is sponsored by the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, are $35 per person and can be purchased at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street. Heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served and there will be a cash bar.

In his 40-year career as a journalist, Dodson has gained international renown for his books on golfing. The Range Bucket List, published in 2017, is a funny, intimate, nostalgic journey of self and sport in which this legendary author completes his golf “bucket list.”

Dodson’s previous books include Final Rounds; Ben Hogan: An American Life; American Triumverate: Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, Ben Hogan and the Age of Modern Golf, which won the U.S. Golf Association’s Herbert Warren Wind Award in 2012; A Golfer’s Life with Arnold Palmer; and A Son of the Game, which was named Top Golf Book of the Year by the International Network of Golf.

In 2011, Dodson won the prestigious Donald Ross Award, given annually by the American Society of Golf Course Architects — only one of two golf writers to receive the award. He is also a recipient of North Carolina’s highest honor, the Order of the Long Leaf Pine.

Dodson and his wife Wendy live in Greensboro.

For further information, call the Asheboro Public Library at 336-318-6801.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Historian Kevin Duffus returns to Asheboro library with tales of Outer Banks shipwrecks

Kevin P. Duffus
ASHEBORO – For more than 450 years, shipwrecks shaped the destiny of North Carolina’s Outer Banks.

Researcher Kevin Duffus will return to the Asheboro Public Library at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, to explore how these incidents created one of the most intriguing histories and cultures in America. His talk is free and the public is invited.

Duffus, author of the 2007 book Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks: An Illustrated Guide, will present a wide-ranging discussion of shipwrecks and their legacies, including lifesaving, rumors of wreckers, and hundreds of forgotten shipwreck victims buried among the dunes.

He will explain the various causes of wrecks, why there is a “Graveyard of the Atlantic” in the first place, what it was like for passengers and crews when ships crashed into the breakers along the banks, and the true stories of some of the most incredible rescues.

Duffus will share the memories of the last living lighthouse keeper on the Outer Banks, the descendants of lifesavers, and residents who played on the decks of a wrecked vessel as children  — and one historian who danced there.

He also will point audience members to the best places to see remains of the derelict ships.

Duffus is an award-winning author, researcher, historian and filmmaker who has made significant discoveries about North Carolina history. His books include The Lost Light: A Civil War Mystery, about his recovery of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse’s missing lens; War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast; and The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate, in which he dispels myths about the notorious buccaneer and uncovers the nature of Black Beard’s treasure.

His appearance is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Abby the Spoon Lady to bring street performance to Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre

Abby the Spoon Lady by John Gellman
ASHEBORO – Asheville street performer Abby the Spoon Lady, and her one-man-band friend Chris Rodrigues, will bring their unique mix of music and storytelling to downtown Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 17.

The performance is free and the public is invited. It is part of the Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series, sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library.

“I fell into both street performance and spoon playing when I started backpacking across the United States,” Abby says. “I became obsessed with folk rhythm and culture, and the stories surrounding.”

She found a rich street performance scene in Asheville and established herself there. She shares the street with Chris Rodrigues, who plays guitar and harmonica while stomping on a suitcase with one foot and tapping on a license plate with the other. The two became best friends and performing partners. They began touring more conventional venues, to often sell-out crowds.

Abby hosts the Busker Broadcast radio show on Asheville FM 101.3.  She also serves as acting president of the Asheville Buskers Collective, founded in 2014 to ensure that street performance remains legal.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information about Abby’s appearance, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, 800-626-2672.

Following Abby, the series will include two more events.

Asheboro native Holly George-Warren will take the stage at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3. One of the country’s foremost music journalists, George-Warren is most recently author of the biographies A Man Called Destruction: The Life of Alex Chilton, from Box Tops to Big Star to Backdoor Man, and Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life and Times of Gene Autry. She is currently working on a biography of Janis Joplin.

Her husband, author and musician Robert Burke Warren, will play music as a soundtrack for her talk.

Journalist Kevin Maurer, who has been embedded with various U.S. military forces since the beginning of the war in Iraq, will appear at 7 p.m. Thursday, September 13. He is author of No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama Bin Laden, which was the top-selling hardcover book of 2012.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Author Charlie Lovett to delve into Holy Grail mystery at Friends of the Library dessert event

Charlie Lovett

ASHEBORO -- New York Times bestselling author Charlie Lovett will spill secrets of the Holy Grail during a Friends of the Randolph County Public Library dessert reception at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, at The Table Farmhouse Bakery in Asheboro.

Seating for the event is limited; tickets are $6 and must be purchased in advance at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street.

In his 2017 novel The Lost Book of the Grail, now being released in paperback, Lovett follows British bibliophile Arthur Prescott and  American researcher Bethany Davis as they uncover tantalizing clues to the location — and nature — of the Grail in a small cathedral town in the English countryside.

Lovett is also author of the novels The Bookman’s Tale, about an investigation spurred by a photo discovered in a book found in a used and rare bookshop, and First Impressions, a mystery involving writer Jane Austen.

He has penned five books on Lewis Carroll, and has lectured internationally on the author. For the 150th anniversary in 2015 of the publication of Alice in Wonderland, he wrote the introduction to a new Penguin Books edition of the work and curated a major exhibition of Carroll artifacts and memorabilia — many of them from his own collection — at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center.

Lovett is also author of plays for children and a novel for  teens. A Winston-Salem native, he is a graduate of Davidson College and the Vermont College of Fine Arts.

He and his family divide their time between Winston-Salem and the village of Kingham in Oxfordshire, England.

For further information, call 336-318-6801.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Meet Llama Llama at Asheboro library


ASHEBORO – Llama Llama, the character from the popular series of children books by Anna Dewdney, will visit the Asheboro Public Library at 4 p.m. Friday, March 2, to help celebrate Read Across America Day.

The event will feature Llama Llama stories, related games and crafts, and a photo opportunity with Llama Llama. It’s free; children and their families are invited.

Read Across America, sponsored by the National Education Association, is an annual event to celebrate reading on the March 2 birthday of Dr. Seuss.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6804 for further information.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

New Asheboro library genealogy classes to cover census, Ancestry.com


ASHEBORO – A new round of workshops for family researchers with librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer will take place in March at the Asheboro Public Library.

The classes, covering census records and Ancestry.com, are free and the public is invited (some of the workshops require registration). The classes are:
              
Making Sense of the Census, 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, March 8. Census records contain important information about individuals and families.  No other source can place people in a certain place at a certain time or provide details over many decades.

Each census record from 1790-1940 is different.  Learn what is unique about the census records from 1790-1940 and how it will benefit your search for ancestors. No registration is required.

Using Ancestry.com Library Edition, 2-3:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 13. Learn the basics of using Ancestry.com, the world’s leading database for researching family history. The workshop will explore the major features of Ancestry, plus provide tips on how to search more effectively. Ancestry Library Edition is available to use free of charge at any Randolph County Library.

The class also will cover differences between Ancestry Library Edition and the subscription version, and how to send your discoveries to your email account. Because a limited number of laptops is available for the class, registration is required; call 336-318-6803 to sign up. You may also bring your own laptop.

Finding Census Records On-line, 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, March 22. Learn how to use computers to search Ancestry Library Edition and Heritage Quest to view actual census images to find information about your ancestors. Explore effective search methods for both federal and state census records and learn how to read between the lines for additional information.

Because a limited number of laptops is available for the class, registration is required; call 336-318-6803 to sign up. You may also bring your own laptop.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Historian to explore NC slave narratives in Asheboro library talk


ASHEBORO – Three courageous African American North Carolinians who escaped slavery put pen to paper to describe their experiences.

Researcher Laurel C. Sneed will share their stories in “Beyond 12 Years A Slave: The Influential Slave Narratives of Tar Heels Moses Roper, Harriet Jacobs, and William H. Singleton” at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The talk, part of the North Carolina Humanities Council’s Road Scholar program, is free and the public is invited.

Sneed will examine how the three authors — Roper from Caswell County, Jacobs from Edenton and Singleton from New Bern — left their mark on the slave narrative literary tradition. The mission of slave narratives was to persuade readers to support the anti-slavery agenda.  She also will discuss the veracity of the narratives, which often are dismissed as propaganda, and compare the North Carolina writings to Solomon Northrop’s  12 Years A Slave.

Based in Durham, Sneed is an educator, researcher and filmmaker. In 1995, her research helped uncover the origins of famed Caswell County cabinetmaker Thomas Day. Since then she has produced a broad range of materials on Day as well as on other African American historical topics.

Her visit is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

‘Candid Critters’ cameras return to Randolph library



A deer captured with a Candid Critters camera in Randolph County in May.
(This work is licensed under a
  CreativeCommons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 InternationalLicense.)
ASHEBORO – Wildlife cameras from the “North Carolina’s Candid Critters” initiative have returned to the Randolph County Public Library and are again available for check out.

Candid Critters, a state sponsored wildlife study, makes cameras available through public libraries. Participants check out the camera to mount on their property or on public land, and weeks later retrieve the images for viewing and uploading.

Cameras were available at the library from January-August, but were moved to other areas of the state in the fall for deer tracking.

Anyone interested in checking out a camera must first register at NCCandidCritters.org. Participants will receive an invitation to complete an online training course.

Library staff will be notified by the Candid Critters organization when a person is approved, and will contact the person to arrange checkout of a camera.

Those who completed the sign-up process previously can check out or reserve a camera by calling 338-318-6803 or by visiting the library. Library staff is available to assist with uploading images to the Candid Critters website.

Data will be used to map trends in animal populations across the state. See images from around the state, including Randolph County cameras, at www.tinyurl.com/candcrit.

Candid Critters is a partnership among NC State University, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, the State Library of NC, NC Cardinal, the state’s public libraries and the Smithsonian Institution.

For more information, call the library at 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

History prof to explore Vietnamese culture in Asheboro library talk


ASHEBORO – In the eyes of many Americans, there is little separation between the image of “Vietnam” and the tragic outcome of U.S. involvement in the war.

But Vietnam as a nation, and the Vietnamese people, have existed in the region for over 2,000 years.

UNC-Greensboro history professor Dr. James Anderson will talk about the country, its people and its traditions in “Vietnamese Culture: Beyond the War” at
6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 15, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Anderson will introduce various aspects of modern Vietnamese society and culture, with a focus on preserving traditions during the country’s emergence from its war-torn past.

His talk is free and the public is invited. It is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

Anderson is head of the History Department at UNCG. He holds masters and Ph.D degrees from the University of Washington, and a B.A. from Harvard University. His fields of study include imperial and modern China, east Asia and Southeast Asia.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Learn about new online test prep resource in Asheboro library class


ASHEBORO – Taking a standardized test for school, work or citizenship?

Learn about the Randolph County Public Library’s new online test preparation resource, the Testing and Educational Reference Center, in “Getting to Know TERC,” 4  p.m. Thursday, February 15, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The TERC provides an interactive learning experience that includes full-length timed practice exams for academic tests such as the SAT, ACT, GED, GRE and others. It also includes professional tests such as the ASVAB (military), NCLEX (nursing), LSAT (law) and Praxis (teaching), as well as resources for college planning, financial aid and career development.

The free class will cover getting started, the tests covered, and the different kinds of help available via the TERC.

The class is focused on teens but all ages are invited.

The TERC is provided to cardholders in the state’s public, community college, university system and independent/private college libraries by NC LIVE, the state’s online library of electronic resources.

The Asheboro library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Monday, January 29, 2018

Backyard gardening with Ben Grandon returns to Asheboro library


ASHEBORO – North Carolina’s long growing season is almost here, and Ben Grandon of Randolph County Cooperative Extension will help you get ready in “Backyard Gardening,” 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 6, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The talk is free and the public is invited. It’s sponsored by Friends of the Library.

Grandon will provide an overview of supplies and equipment you will need, and answer gardening questions. He also will highlight services available through Cooperative Extension to ensure bountiful harvests of fruits and veggies.

Grandon is an agriculture-horticulture agent for Cooperative Extension.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6806 for further information.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Randolph library offers free access to Consumer Reports, other powerful online resources

ASHEBORO – Need a new washing machine? Want to find out which digital camera is best? The best deal on a lawn mower?

The Randolph County Public Library can help as Consumer Reports, along with other new resources, become available online – for free – via the library’s research website, www.randquest.org. They join a host of existing resources that enable user to dive deep into research in almost any field.

All it takes to gain access is a computer ( or tablet or phone), an Internet connection, and a library card or REAL2 student ID.

“Google can answer immediate questions and give you quick answers,” says Library Director Ross Holt. “But the resources the library has to offer give you a depth of knowledge you can’t find on the Internet at large – or that you can find but would have to pay for.”

Students who need the full text of articles from current magazines and academic journals – or those going back many years into the past – can now search two sources, Masterfile  Premier and ProQuest Magazines and Journals. There also are resources covering specific topics – science, literature, biography and current issues – as well as general reference libraries.

A test-preparation and study resource, the Testing & Education Reference Center, is available for those getting ready for academic placement tests or career certification exams.

Mango Languages lets users learn any of 70 languages, or English as speakers of 17 languages.

For the job hunter, Cypress Resume is a handy tool for quickly creating resumes, and Ferguson’s Career Guidance Center profiles 3,400 jobs in 140 industries with information about educational requirements, necessary skills and typical job responsibilities.

History and genealogy researchers can take advantage of the power of Heritage Quest to seek census and other information, and Historical North Carolina Newspapers from Newspapers.com to delve into the events of the past.

Business users will find Reference USA, a massive database of companies along with white page listings for individuals, and Simply Analytics, a powerful demographic research tool. Investors can keep tabs on their portfolio with Morningstar Investment Research Center.

For shade tree mechanics and other car enthusiasts, there’s AutoMate, an auto service and repair resource.

Two streaming video services also are available: the NC LIVE Video Collection, which provides access to most PBS programming, and Films on Demand, which includes documentaries, educational films and instructional videos.

Most of the resources are provided by NC LIVE, the state’s online library, which is available to public library cardholders and those with university system, community college or independent/private college IDs.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Learn ‘Grocery Secrets’ in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – Find out tips for effective and cost-conscious grocery shopping in “Grocery Secrets,” 6:30 p.m. Monday, January 22, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Jeannie Leonard, Family and Consumer Sciences agent with Randolph County Cooperative Extension, will show you how to use grocery store layout to your advantage, maximize your shopping dollars with coupons, and get out of the store faster by planning meals ahead of time.

Leonard’s talk is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Popular professor Elliot Engel to kick of new lecture series at Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre

Professor Elliot Engel
Literary lecturer Dr. Elliot Engel will inaugurate an eclectic new series of lectures and performances for 2018 as the Friends of the Library Sunset Signature Series gets underway.  

The series, which will take place in downtown Asheboro’s historic Sunset Theatre, is sponsored by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library.

Engel will appear at 7 p.m. Tuesday, January 23, with a lively talk, “Our Slippery Mother Tongue: A Light History of English.” His appearance is free and the public is invited.

Using anecdotes, analysis and large doses of humor, Engel will bring to life the fascinating development of the English language from the Anglo-Saxons to the invading French, and beyond.

Engel has delivered his highly entertaining but historically detailed talks worldwide over his 30-year career. He is author of 10 books; his lecture series about Charles Dickens appeared on PBS stations around the country. Four of plays he has written have been produced in the past 10 years.

In 2009, he was inducted into the Royal Society of Arts in England for his academic work and his promotion of Dickens. Sales of his CDs and DVDs have raised funds for the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital in London, which Dickens helped found in 1852.

Engel lives in Raleigh and has taught at UNC-Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University and Duke University. He holds a Ph.D. from UCLA , where he won the Outstanding Teaching Award.

Installments of the series following Engel will take place in March, May and September:
  • Asheville busker and radio personality Abby the Spoon Lady will perform at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 17. She will be accompanied by Chris Rodrigues, another Asheville street performer who is a one-man band.  Abby developed her talent while hitchhiking and hopping freight trains through 48 states. She’s a mainstay on the streets of Asheville and a radio personality who performs around the country, sharing her music and telling stories about her experiences.
  • Asheboro native Holly George-Warren will take the stage at 7  p.m. Thursday, May 3. One of the country’s foremost music journalists, George-Warren is most recently penned the biographies A Man Called Destruction: The Life of Alex Chilton, from Box Tops to Big Star to Backdoor Man, and Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life and Times of Gene Autry. She is currently working on a biography of Janis Joplin. Her husband, author and musician Robert Burke Warren, will play music as a soundtrack for her talk.
  • Journalist Kevin Maurer, who has been embedded with various U.S. military forces since the beginning of the war in Iraq, will appear at 7 p.m. Thursday, September 13. He is author of No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama Bin Laden,  which was the top-selling hardcover book of 2012
The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Ave. in Asheboro. For further information, call the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau at 800-626-2672.