Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Learn how to avoid scams in Asheboro library workshop

ASHEBORO – Learn how to avoid falling victim to various schemes and cons in “Don’t Get Scammed,” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 14, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Join Sgt. Charles Burrow of the Asheboro Police Department’s Community Resources Team as he discusses what steps you can take to prevent being the victim of various scams, including phone scams, real estate swindles and identity theft. He also will guide attendees through deciphering the signs of a scam.

The presentation is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information,  call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Asheboro library to offer Internet job seeking classes

ASHEBORO – The Internet can be an important tool in finding and applying for a job, but also can be a bit intimidating.

Learn about searching for jobs, filling out online applications and more in “Internet Job Hunting 101” classes coming up in November at the Asheboro Public Library.

The class will be offered from 10:30-11:30 a.m. on Thursday, November 2, and repeated 3:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 22.

Each class is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Author Bruce Anne Shook to share parents’ WWII romance through letters in Asheboro library talk

Bruce Anne (Brucie) Parcell Shook
at her father's gravesite in Normandy.
ASHEBORO – Shortly after her mother’s death, Bruce Anne (Brucie) Parcell Shook discovered World War II letters between her mother in the U.S. and her fighter pilot father in Europe.

The letters told the story of the couple’s romance through 1944, when Shook’s father died in a plane crash in France. She has compiled the letters in an book entitled She Named Me Bruce: A Daughter’s Discovery of Her Parents’ World War II Romance, published in August.

Shook will talk about the letters between her father, Bruce Parcell —for whom she is named— and her mother, Frances, in a Friends of the Library program at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 8, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Her appearance is free and the public is invited.

Shook was born in Statesville two months after the death of her father. She grew up to be a junior high school English and history teacher before becoming a school library media specialist, a position from which she retired in 2005. She now resides in Greensboro.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Museum curator to explore Day of the Dead in Asheboro library talk

Day of the Dead sugar skull and figurines.
ASHEBORO -- The Day the of Dead is celebrated in Mexico simultaneously with the Catholic observances of All Saints and All Souls Days, November 1 and 2, as a festive time when families remember their dead and honor the continuity of life.

Join Sara Cromwell, curator of the Wake Forest University Museum of Anthropology’s annual Day of the Dead exhibit, for a talk entitled “Life After Death: The Day of the Dead in Mexico,” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 24, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Cromwell’s discussion of the unique Mexican observance will include its history, modern variations and associated folk art.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Library, it’s free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

History prof to explore role of American Indians during the Revolution in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO -- The often-overlooked history of the Native people of America’s Southeast in the Revolutionary War is the topic of a talk by UNC-Greensboro history professor Greg O’Brien at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, October 26, at the Asheboro Public Library.

O’Brien’s talk, “Southern Indians in the American Revolution,” is free and the public is invited. It is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

In much of what is now the southern United States, American Indians played a significant, even decisive, role as all sides relied on them as allies. Indian people pursued their own agendas and also had an impact on post-war economic and political development.

In addition to his teaching duties, O’Brien edits the journal Native South and has written extensively about native peoples of the Southeast.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Jugtown historian Steve Compton to trace pottery’s history in Asheboro library talk

Steve Compton
ASHEBORO – The history and influence of Jugtown Pottery will come to light in a talk by pottery historian and collector Steve Compton at 7 p.m. Thursday, October 5, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, Compton’s appearance is free and the public is invited.

His talk, “Jugtown Pottery 1917-2017: A Century of Art and Craft in Clay,” shares a title with the book he published in June tracing the pottery’s history.

Jugtown was founded by Jacques Busbee, an artist from Raleigh, and his wife Juliana. Arriving in Seagrove in 1917, they gave national exposure to the traditional potters of the area by featuring the area’s wares in Juliana’s Greenwich Village tea room and shop.

The enterprising couple later founded Jugtown and employed local potters, paving the way for the development of the Seagrove area as the nation’s pottery center.

Compton’s talk will feature images from his lavishly-illustrated book.

Compton is an avid collector of mid-18th to mid-20th century pottery and has penned numerous books and articles about it, including Seagrove Potteries Through Time and It’s just Dirt! The Historic Art Potteries of North Carolina’s Seagrove Region. Widely recognized for his expertise, he is frequently called on as a lecturer and exhibit curator.

He formerly served as president of the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, and is a founding organizer of the North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

History prof looks at youthful Revolutionary War soldiers in Asheboro library talk

Dr. Jake Rudman
ASHEBORO – Young soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution.

“Going for a soldier” forced young men to confront profound uncertainty and coercion, but serving in the military also offered novel opportunities.

Historian Dr. Jake Rudman will consider the experiences of these young men in “Becoming Men of Some Consequence: Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War,” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 28, at the Asheboro Public Library. The talk, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Based on his 2014 book of the same title, Rudman’s talk examines the soldiers’ relationships, economic goals and politics, and their visions of their own independence.

Rudman, who holds a PhD in American History from Yale University, is an associate professor of history at Wake Forest University.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Teens: build a homemade radio in Asheboro library event

ASHEBORO – Teens are invited to learn the basics of radio science and help build a radio at 5 p.m. Wednesday, September 27, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Find out about AM/FM frequencies and even try to hear sounds from outer space. Will the radio built by participants pick up local stations?

The workshop is free.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for more information.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Teens invited to learn basics of chess at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – All teens are invited to join Asheboro Chess Club founder Tom Hales for a beginners introduction to the greatest strategy game in the world in “The Basics of Chess,” 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, September 21, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Learn the fundamentals, the history of the game and find out about the Chess Club.

The workshop is free.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for more information.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Researcher Kevin P. Duffus returns to Asheboro library to reveal Black Beard’s last days

Kevin P. Duffus
ASHEBORO – What truly happened during Black Beard’s last days that precipitated his demise?

Who, truly, was Edward Teach, and whence did he come? What was his true name? And where may he have hidden his treasure?

Join researcher Kevin P. Duffus as he shares groundbreaking research into Black Beard’s life — and death — at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 20, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Duffus’s presentation, “The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate,” is free and the public is invited.

For years, Duffus wondered if it was possible to learn something new about the legendary pirate. After extensive research at archives in Great Britain, Pennsylvania and the Carolinas, he discovered that the answer was yes. And the true story about Black Beard’s last days substantially change the legend — and history.

Duffus, an award-winning author, researcher,  and filmmaker, has made significant discoveries about North Carolina history — starting when he was 17 and found a Confederate gunboat sunken in a river near his home.

He is author of The Lost Light: A Civil War Mystery, about his recovery of the Cape Hatteras lighthouse’s missing Fresnel lens, and War Zone: World War II off the North Carolina Coast.

His appearance is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

History prof looks at German POWS held in NC during WWII in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – More than 10,000 German prisoners of war were interned in North Carolina during World War II, but few people were aware of their presence.

Wingate University history professor emeritus Dr. Robert Billinger will reveal startling facts about the prisoners in “Nazi POWs in the Tar Heel State during World War II,” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 14, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Billinger’s lively talk will include photos, maps and documents to recount the prisoners’ arrival, work, escapes, re-education and repatriation. The story also reveals the surprising diversity of the POWs: U-boat sailors captured off the North Carolina coast,  paratroopers captured in Europe and North Africa, Nazis, anti-Nazis, former concentration camp inmates, and a multitude of men captured in German uniforms who before the war had been Austrians, Belgians, Frenchmen and Soviets.

The talk, sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library’s Robert C. Taylor Jr. Memorial World War II Collection, is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6806 for more information.

Learn to make yeast bread, freezer meals in library-sponsored cooking classes at Cooperative Extension

Jeannie Leonard
ASHEBORO – Get tips on making yeast bread and preparing freezer meals during two classes in September with Randolph County Cooperative Extension agent Jeannie Leonard.

Sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library’s Margaret C. Taylor Culinary Arts Collection bequest, both workshops will take place at Cooperative Extension headquarters, 1003 S. Fayetteville St. (Hillside Shopping Center).

“Intro to Yeast Bread Making” is a beginner-level class at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 7. Leonard will demonstrate the process and answer questions.

In  “Make Dinner Ahead: Freezer Meals” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 28, learn to save money and time by making convenience foods with ingredients on sale at the grocery store, and freezing them. Later, just thaw and cook.

The classes are open to adults age 18 and older. Space is limited for both programs; call 336-318-6803 to sign up or for further information.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Illusionist, storyteller Caleb Sigmon to perform at Asheboro library

Illusionist and storyteller Caleb Sigmon
ASHEBORO – Storyteller and illusionist Caleb Sigmon will materialize with an unexpected coda to “Build a Better World,” the library’s Summer Reading initiative, at 2 p.m. Tuesday, August 15, at the Asheboro Public Library.

His performance, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and children of all ages and their families are invited.

Sigmon says he uses magic to share his story, his passion and his heart with others.

Born in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, he spent his childhood playing inside cardboard boxes, fighting dragons and playing Cowboys and Indians in his backyard. Now, he has made it his career.

He graduated from one of the top 10 national arts schools and immediately went to work forging his own way with a unique blend of magic, drama and storytelling. He performs over 150 shows annually in schools, libraries, churches and performing arts centers, and has appeared at venues ranging from the Virginia Beach Boardwalk to the Johnny Carson Theatre in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Sigmon was originally scheduled to perform on June 21, but was unavoidably detained elsewhere.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Asheboro library program on NC women in WWI canceled

“North Carolina’s Women ‘Do Their Bit’ During WWI,” a talk scheduled for the evening of Thursday, August 17, at the Asheboro Public Library, has been canceled due to an unexpected and unavoidable conflict on the part of the presenter.

The program may be rescheduled in the fall.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

LEGO Mania for teens returns to Asheboro library on August 11

ASHEBORO – Wrap up “Build a Better World,” the Randolph County Public Library’s Summer Reading initiative – and actually build some imaginative worlds – during the 9th Annual LEGO Mania competition, 2-4 p.m. Friday, August 11 at the Asheboro Public Library.

Teens and ‘tweens ages 11-18 are invited to create ingenious LEGO structures for fun and prizes. The event is free but registration is required; call 318-6803 to sign up.

Participants will be divided into teams and age-appropriate groups to compete for prizes to be awarded by community judges.

LEGO Mania is sponsored by the Friends of the Library as part of the Summer Reading initiative. For more information about the library’s Summer Reading programs and a complete schedule of events, visit www.randolphlibrary.org/summer.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro.

Dig up ancestors in Asheboro library genealogy classes

ASHEBORO – Get to know your relatives — at the cemetery and through online genealogy resources.

Join librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer for “A Grave Encounter” at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, August 12, at the Asheboro library.
                                                                                         
Palmer will present pointers on cemetery research for those exploring their family history. She will talk about what information the records reveal, how to prepare for a cemetery visit, and what you can find online.

The workshop is free and no sign-up is required.

Meanwhile, learn about digging up ancestors online using library genealogy database in two more free classes.

“Genealogy with Heritage Quest” will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 15.

“Genealogy with Ancestry Library Edition” will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 22.

Call 336-318-6803 to sign up for these classes or for further information.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street.

Explore role of NC women in World War I during Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – When World War I broke out in 1914, women on North Carolina’s home front stood poised to support war-ravaged Europe because they already were organized to provide resources to the needy and vulnerable in their own communities.

Learn about their unique  contributions in “North Carolina’s Women  ‘Do Their Bit’ During WWI,” a talk by historian and educator Dr. Angela Robbins at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, August 17, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Library, Robbins’ appearance is free and the public is invited.

When the U.S. entered the war in 1917, women encouraged and supported one another to “do their bit,” coordinating the efforts of local groups with newly-formed state and national organizations to provide care packages for soldiers, grow and preserve food in the wake of severe shortages, raise funds through Liberty Bond drives, collect supplies for the Red Cross, and more.

After the war, their activism helped empower them to claim the right to vote and shape their own destinies.

Robbins is an instructor at UNC-Greensboro and Salem College. She holds a Ph.D. in History from UNCG and a masters in Museum Studies. She has worked in education and collections management at the International Civil Rights Center and Museum, the Greensboro Historical Museum, Blandwood Mansion and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Learn about grilling and herbs in library-sponsored cooking classes at Cooperative Extension

ASHEBORO  -- Begin and end August with classes on grilling and using herbs in your recipes, with Randolph County Cooperative Extension Agent Jeannie Leonard. 

Sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library’s Margaret C. Taylor Memorial Culinary Arts Collection, the classes will take place at Cooperative Extension’s new headquarters in Hillside Shopping Center, 1003 S. Fayetteville St. in Asheboro.

In “Get Your Grilling On,” a demonstration class at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, August 3, Leonard will provide information on making healthy, nutritious meals on the grill, including meats and side dishes.

In “Cooking with Herbs,” a demonstration class at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, August 31, Leonard will discuss the differences between herbs and spices, and how to buy, store and prepare each to maximum advantage. She also will talk about the distinctive flavors of various herbs and spices.

Both classes are free, but each is limited to 25 participants. Call 336-318-6803 to sign up or for further information.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Library offers wireless printing

ASHEBORO – Library users now can print documents from their laptops, tablets and phones at any Randolph County Public Library location, via the library’s free WIFI.

To use the wireless printing service inside the library, go to www.randolphlibrary.org/printing.htm on your personal device. Choose the appropriate library location and follow online the prompts.

Printouts cost 20 cents per page.

The library offers both free WIFI and wired Internet desktop computers for public use at each of its seven branches, in Asheboro, Archdale, Franklinville, Liberty, Ramseur, Randleman and Seagrove. For library locations and hours, visit www.randolphlibrary.org/locationhrcontact.htm.

For further information or assistance, ask library staff or call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Learn how to avoid ‘false facts’ by citing sources in Asheboro library genealogy talk

ASHEBORO -- Many family researchers create “false facts” by failing to cite their sources. Join librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer for a primer on documenting discoveries at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 8, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Palmer will focus on citing media such as the Internet, books, magazines, newspapers, Bibles, interviews and cemeteries, as well as hand-written information on scraps of paper, to document your research.

Her presentation is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6815.  

WCU prof to feature Cherokee artisans in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – Learn about the Elders, 20th century artisans who have kept key Cherokee craft traditions alive, in a talk by Western Carolina University professor Anna Fariello at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 11, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Fariello’s appearance, part of the North Carolina Humantities Council’s Road Scholars program, is free and the public is invited.

Focusing on the key traditions of basketry, pottery and carving, this highly visual event recognizes the Elders and the thousands of unnamed makers who created and maintained traditions during centuries past.

Fariello is author of the “From the Hands of our Elders” series, which includes three books and a website produced to share important archival collections of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians with the general public. For this project, she was honored in 2013 with a Guardians of Culture Award from the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

She also penned the interpretive travel guide Blue Ridge Roadways, and was named recipient of the 2010 Brown Hudson Award from the North Carolina Folklore Society.

This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Live “Happily Ever After” in July during Summer Reading at Randolph’s libraries

Bright Star Touring Theatre will present "Happily Ever After"
at all libraries during July.
ASHEBORO – Live “Happily Ever After” as the Bright Star Touring Theater brings its hilarious rendition of Grimm Brothers stories to all Randolph County Public Library locations as the library’s summer reading initiative, “Build a Better World,” continues into July.

The theatre troupe will transform into Rapunzel, Little Red Riding Hood, Rumplestiltskin, and the Elves and the Shoemaker in their not-so-grim adventure loaded with audience participation and an endless stream of laughs. The shows will take place as follows:
  • Archdale: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 19;
  • Asheboro: 2  p.m. Wednesday, July 19;
  • Franklinville: 2 p.m. Thursday, July 20;
  • Liberty: 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 18;
  • Ramseur: 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 20;
  • Randleman: 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 27;
  • Seagrove: 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 18.
Meanwhile, there will be more performances, storytimes, hands-on activities and movies at all the libraries. Highlights will include Balloon Magic with Asheboro native Clark Sides at Archdale and Seagrove; Magical Storyteller Mark Daniel at Randleman and percussive performer The Spoon Man at Liberty. The NC Zoo’s Animal Architects will visit Archdale, and the Flow Circus will bring its act to Randleman.

Find a full schedule of events at www.randolphlibrary.org/summer, visit your local library, or call 336-318-6804.

The Summer Reading Program is sponsored by Friends of the Randolph County Public Library with support from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. It’s part of a national effort to keep children reading during the break from school; research shows that kids who read during the summer do better in school the next year.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Discover N.C’s moonshine history in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – Get an overview of the history of illicit distilling in North Carolina in “White Liquor and White Lies” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 29, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The talk, presented  by K. Todd Johnson, executive director of the Johnston County Heritage Center in Smithfield, is free and the public is invited. It is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

Johnson will explore the social history of the liquor trade from colonial times to the recent past, and share firsthand accounts from North Carolinians on both sides of the law, including legendary personalities such as firearms inventor Carbine Williams, bootlegger Percy Flowers and race car driver Junior Johnson.

He regrets that no samples of the product he is discussing will be provided to the audience.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Botanist to shed light on flowers in Asheboro library talk

ASHEBORO – Find out everything you always wanted to know about flowers, but were afraid to ask, in “It’s a What?!”, a talk by UNC-Greensboro biology professor Dr. Bruce Kirchoff at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 19, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Learn about the importance of flowers as plants propagate themselves, with a little help from the bird and the bees (and the bats and the lemurs, and the flies and the wind). Kirchoff, a botanist and winner of UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, will explore the marvelously varied world of plant reproduction, from a flower that appears once in 50 years to one that cannot reproduce without a specific kind of wasp.

He also will discuss why using native plants in your garden is so important.

His talk is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Teens can 'Build a Better World' at Randolph libraries this summer

ASHEBORO – A roller coaster, a wild scavenger hunt, video games, art classes, a Summer Pottery Slam, the 9th annual LEGO Mania competition and more will empower teens to “Build a Better World” during Summer Reading activities at Randolph County’s public libraries.

All events are free and all teens are invited.

The Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street, will offer teens ages 11-18 the opportunity to play video games on their own schedules. Teens can use their library cards or public school student ID numbers (“lunch numbers”) to check out Xbox or PlayStation game controllers and age-appropriate video games, and play in a conference room has been set aside for gaming when it is not booked for other uses.

Also at Asheboro:
  • Teens can participate in the creation of a paper roller coaster during the week of June 12; drop in anytime to work on it until it goes into action on Friday, June 16.
  • The movie Pete’s Dragon will be screened a 3 p.m. Thursday, June 22.
  • During the week of June 26, the TeenZone Wild Goose Chase Scavenger Hunt will take place, with clues leading to prizes concealed in the library’s book collection.
  • Marvel Comics artist John Czop will help teens hone their drawing skills and learn the ways of the comic book industry in classes at 2 p.m. on Thursdays July 13-August 3. New scribblers as well as accomplished artists are welcome. A final reveal of the works created in the class will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday, August 10.
  • LEGO Mania will challenge teams of teens to build a world or tell a story at 2 p.m. Friday, August 11.

Teens also can report the number of books or minutes they read for a chance at a reading reward.

At the Archdale Public Library, 10433 S. Main St., join area potters for guidance in creating your own piece of pottery, 2-5 p.m. Tuesday, June 20. Then, celebrate “Christmas In July” with crafts, contests and snacks from 3-5 p.m. Tuesday, July 25 (registration for this event is required; call 336-431-3811 to sign up).

The Liberty Public Library, 239 S. Fayetteville Street, will offer “#hangout: Just Teens” at 3:30 p.m. each Friday through the end of July, featuring makers activities such as Duck Tape Creations, Free Style String Art, Metal Washer Jewelry and more. The library also offers weekly Get Creative craft activities for teens and adults at 3:30 p.m. Thursdays.

“Mad Science” will take over the Randleman Public Library, 142 W. Academy St., as teens and tweens explore ecosystems, bubbling potions and radical robots. Sessions take place at 3:30 p.m. Thursdays, June 22, July 6 and July 20. Registration is required; call 336-498-3141 to sign up. Teens at Randleman can keep their check-out receipts and turn them in to be entered in drawings for two Kindle Fire tablets to be given away on August 22.

For more information about library summer activities for teens, visit www.randolphlibrary.org/summer/teens.htm, or contact your local library.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Poet Presnell to reflect on impact of war on families in Asheboro library reading

Barbara Presnell
ASHEBORO – The impact of war on families is the theme of a new collection of poems by Asheboro native Barbara Presnell.

Presnell will read from her work, Blue Star, in a Friends of the Library talk at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 22, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Her appearance is free and the public is invited.

In the poems, Presnell weaves military records, census reports, letters, journals and photographs into a tapestry that tells the 100-year story her family’s involvement in war from the Civil War to the present. To complete the collection, Presnell, her brother and her sister retraced their father’s World War II journey from Omaha Beach to the Elbe River in Germany, following his map and journal entries.

The title Blue Star refers to the stars on banners that family members hang in their windows when a son or daughter is in the service.

Presnell is author of five books of poetry, including Piece Work, a collection of poems built around life and work in Asheboro’s textile mills, where Presnell’s father worked until his death in 1969. Piece Work won the Cleveland State University (CSU) Poetry Center’s First Book Prize and was published by CSU in 2007.

One of its poems, “Pauline Loves to Sew,” was included in the April 2014 Our State magazine’s list of 10 poems every North Carolinian should read. In 2009, Piece Work was adapted for the stage by the Touring Theatre Ensemble of North Carolina, and performed in community colleges and other venues around the state.

Presnell, whose poetry also has appeared in many journals and anthologies, now lives in Lexington, and teaches in the writing and honors programs at UNC-Charlotte.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Friday, June 2, 2017

Best-selling author John Hart to make Asheboro appearance

John Hart
ASHEBORO — New York Times Best-selling author John Hart, winner of two consecutive Edgar Awards for mystery fiction, will make a special appearance in Asheboro at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 15, at the [NOTE CHANGE OF VENUE] Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street.

Hart’s visit, sponsored by the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library, is free and the public is invited. Journalist Chip Womick will talk with Hart in an on-stage interview format.

A North Carolina native, Hart is author of the 2016 best-selling novel Redemption Road and of four New York Times bestsellers: The King of Lies, Down River, The Last Child, and Iron House.

The only author in history to win the best novel Edgar Allan Poe Award for consecutive novels, Hart has also won the Barry Award, the Southern Independent Bookseller's Award for Fiction, the Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award and the North Carolina Award for Literature. His novels have been translated into 30 languages and can be found in over 70 countries.

Hart’s work has been compared to that of Scott Turow and John Grisham. His books take place in North Carolina, where he was born and lives. Before his appearance in Asheboro, he will make a stop in Charlotte with Grisham.

His newest novel, The Hush, is scheduled for release in early 2018.

A 1988 graduate of Davidson College and a former defense attorney and stockbroker, Hart spends his time in North Carolina and Virginia, where he writes full-time.

Hart will sign copies of his books after his talk. His books will be available for purchase at the Randolph/Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street, from 5-7 p.m. prior to the event.

For further information, contact the Randolph/Asheboro Public Library at 336-318-6803.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

‘Build a Better World’ during Randolph library Summer Reading

Shana Tucker's "ChamberSoul Cello
Stories" will kick off Summer Reading
at all libraries in June.
ASHEBORO – Join in and “Build a Better World” as the Randolph County Public Library’s 2017 Summer Reading Program gets underway with appearances by musician and songwriter Shana Tucker at all seven libraries, and over 200 more storytimes, performances, hands-on activities, movies, author appearances and more for children,
teens and adults.

The reading initiative runs during June and July at the Archdale, Asheboro,  Franklinville, Liberty, Ramseur, Randleman and Seagrove libraries.

During the summer, children can sign up to track minutes or books read in return for reading rewards. Last year, local children ages 0 thru 12th grade and their families checked out over 57,000 books and reported reading for more than 778,000 minutes.

Teens and adults can get in on the act too, and keep track of their summer reading for chances to win prizes such as gift certificates to the Friends of the Library Bookshop.

Schedules and complete details can be found at www.randolphlibrary.org/summer and at your local library.

The Asheboro library will kick off its summer events from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, June 3, with “Pop-Up Play Daze” outdoors and a “Balloon Magic” performance by Asheboro native Clark Sides. At the Liberty library, aerialist Amanda Finch will perform breathtaking stunts at a Summer Reading Opening Celebration carnival from 10-11:30 a.m. Saturday, June 10.

Tucker, a cellist based in the Triangle, will bring a unique blend of jazz, acoustic pop and folk music to each library in June with “ChamberSoul Cello Stories,”  accompanied by guitarist Emily Musolino. The duo will appear at the libraries as follows:
·        Archdale, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 14;
·        Asheboro, 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 13;
·        Franklinville, 2 p.m. Thursday, June 15;
·        Liberty, 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 13;
·        Ramseur, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, June 22;
·        Randleman, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, June 15;
·        Seagrove, 2 p.m. Thursday, June 22.

In July, Asheville’s Bright Star Touring Theatre will visit all the libraries with “Happily Ever After,” a laugh-out-loud take on Grimm Brothers’ fairy tales that will invite lots of audience participation.

In between, all the libraries will offer a range of weekly storytimes, performances and other activities. Percussive performer The Spoon Man will visit Archdale, Liberty and Randleman libraries; Balloon magician Clark Sides also will appear at Randleman, and Joy the Clown will entertain kids at Randleman and Seagrove. Randleman will host the ever popular “Snakes Alive” with Ron Cromer.

Teens, meanwhile, can build a roller coaster, go on a scavenger hunt, play videogames and take a comic book art class in Asheboro, while in Archdale they can participate in a Summer Pottery Slam and celebrate Christmas in July. In Liberty, they can hang out at weekly “#hangout” maker events and “Get Creative” in weekly craft activities, and in Randleman, engage in some “Mad Science.”

The 9th annual Lego Mania competition will cap things off on August 11 in Asheboro.

Adults in Asheboro can find out about the exotic ways flowers propagate themselves, hear from poet Barbara Presnell, learn about white lighting in North Carolina and explore the heritage of Cherokee crafts. In Randleman and Liberty, they can enjoy weekly craft events, and in Liberty also attend a computer class series.

The Summer Reading Program is sponsored by Friends of the Randolph County Public Library with support from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. It’s part of a national effort to keep children reading during the break from school; research shows that kids who read during the summer do better in school the next year.

Randolph library Friends, Partnership for Children, launch ‘Books for Babies’ campaign

Shannon McCrary and Frances Jones display the contents
of the Randolph Books for Babies kit.
ASHEBORO – Every one of the 800 children born at Randolph Health (formerly Randolph Hospital) each year will get a jumpstart on reading as “Randolph Books for Babies” swings into action on May 31.

An initiative of the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library and the Randolph Partnership for Children (RPC), the project is aimed at acquainting parents of newborns with the important role they play in their babies’ brain development, and introducing parents to the resources available at their public libraries.

“Reading to babies contributes to the development of their growing brains and gives them a good start towards a lifelong love of reading and good literature,” says Dr. Frances Jones, incoming Friends president.

“When you read to babies it helps speech development as they are taking in information and beginning to learn about speech patterns.”

Jones initiated and developed the project with RPC Literacy Specialist Shannon McCrary and hospital officials.

Trained volunteers will deliver specially designed Randolph Books for Babies kits to newborns’ families at Randolph Health. The kits, packaged in a useful tote bag, will include:
· a board book for the baby;
· a children’s “My First” library card;
· a handmade reading blanket crafted locally by church groups and other volunteers;
· a schedule of storytimes at the seven branches of the Randolph County Public Library and other library information;
· a bibliography of books available at the library that are suitable for each stage of the babies; development from 0 to five months;
· early literacy information from national education associations;
· information about safe sleep from the Randolph County Health Department.

Jones raised almost $10,000 in contributions for the project’s first year. Donors include RPC, the Acme-McCrary and Sapona Foundation, Chris and Stacy Griffin, William and Dr. Frances Jones, Friends of the Library, the Kiwanis Club of Asheboro, and the Sorosis Club of Asheboro.

Fundraising efforts for year two and beyond are underway; for information about making a contribution or further information about the program, call 336-318-6814.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Learn how to ‘check vitals’ in Asheboro library genealogy class

ASHEBORO -- Learn about genealogical and historical information that can be found through vital statistics in “Be Sure to Check their Vitals,” 2 p.m. Saturday, May 20, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The class is free and the public is invited.

Vital statistics are data about populations, such as births, marriages, health and deaths. Librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer will discuss what time periods such records cover, search strategies and how to access the information online, with an emphasis on North Carolina records.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6815.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Author Jill McCorkle to headline Friends of the Library event in Asheboro

Jill McCorkle
ASHEBORO – Novelist and Lumberton native Jill McCorkle, who has the distinction of having her first two books published simultaneously, will keynote the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library Annual Meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 11, at the Sunset Theater in downtown Asheboro.

McCorkle’s appearance, sponsored  by the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau, the City of Asheboro and the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Those first two novels — The Cheerleader and July 7th, published on the same day in 1984 by Algonquin Books — have been followed by four others, including Ferris Beach, Carolina Moon, Tending to Virginia and Life After Life. She is also author of four short story collections.

Five of McCorkle’s books have been named New York Times Notable Books. She is recipient of the John Dos Passos Prize for Literature, the North Carolina Award for Literature and the New England Booksellers Award.

Her short stories have appeared in numerous literary magazines, and five have been included in Best American Short Stories.

McCorkle teaches creative writing in the MFA program at North Carolina State University and is a core faculty member of the Bennington College Writers Seminars. She also has taught at the University of North Carolina, Tufts University, Brandeis University and Harvard.

She currently resides in Hillsborough with her husband, photographer Tom Rankin.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Monday, April 24, 2017

Learn canning basics at Randolph Cooperative Extension

Jeannie Leonard
ASHEBORO – Join NC Cooperative Extension Agent Jeannie Leonard for “The Basics of Canning” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 – and check out the expanded kitchen facilities – at the new Randolph County Cooperative Extension headquarters, 1003 S. Fayetteville St. (Hillside Shopping Center) in Asheboro.

Find out how to choose the best preservation canning method and see some of the tools used.

Leonard’s talk, sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library and Cooperative Extension, is free and the public is invited. Call 336-318-6803 to reserve a space.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Novelist Joe Epley to debut epic tale of Col. David Fanning at Asheboro library

Joe Epley
ASHEBORO – Get into A Passel of Trouble at the Asheboro Public Library as author Joe Epley debuts his novel about the life of Col. David Fanning, the notorious — or heroic, depending on your point of view — Loyalist militia leader in the Revolutionary War.

Epley, a former Green Beret, journalist and public relations executive, will talk about his book at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 6, at the library. The event, sponsored by the library’s Randolph Room, is free and the public is invited.

Fanning is legendary in Randolph and Chatham counties, where from 1780-1782 he fought pitched battles against supporters of American Independence. He is known for raiding homesteads, killing revolutionary leader Col. Andrew Balfour, nearly burning Col. Philip Alston and his family out of the House in the Horseshoe, and chasing Andrew Hunter – on Fanning’s stolen horse – off Faith Rock into the Deep River.  

In A Passel of Trouble, Epley depicts Fanning as a born leader and a capable young man on the verge of success in South Carolina when war breaks out. As neighbors take sides against each other, Fanning chooses loyalty to the King.

The journey that leads him to Randolph County is seen through the eyes of his friend Josh, who leaves his Quaker faith to join the Loyalist cause.

To help ensure the novel’s historical authenticity, Epley received an assist from local historians Warren Dixon and Mac Whatley with research and fact-checking.

Now retired and a resident of Tryon, N.C., Epley operated Epley Associates, a public relations firm in Charlotte, for 38 years. He’s also author of A Passel of Hate, about the battle of Kings Mountain.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6815.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Learn how to use the Census for family research in Asheboro library class

ASHEBORO – Make sense of the Census for family history research in “Census Sense” with librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer, 2-3:30 p.m. Friday, April 28, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Discover how the Census can help, and what information is often overlooked. Learn about using censuses prior to 1850, common errors and alternative records.

The workshop is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6815.

Celebrate El día de los niños/El día de los libros with Curious George at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – Celebrate El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day) with outdoor stories, games and food from around the world from 11 a.m. -2 p.m. Saturday, April 29, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Bring the family and meet special guest Curious George while celebrating the importance of literacy and reading for children of all cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

The event, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free. All children and their families are invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6804.

Music prof to explore life of jazz drummer Max Roach at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO -- The contributions of legendary jazz drummer and North Carolina native Max Lemuel Roach are the focus of a talk by Douglas Jackson, a music professor and performer, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 27, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Jackson will present a multimedia profile of Roach’s life that includes recordings of his music. It’s free and the public is invited.

Roach, a Pasquotank County native, was an innovative master drummer, percussionist and composer who performed and recorded with numerous jazz luminaries including Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk. He performed on over 100 commercial recordings and holds over 100 copyrights.

Jackson, a Los Angeles native, is an assistant professor of music at Elizabeth City State University where he teaches trumpet, music business and jazz ensemble. He has performed on trumpet internationally, including at the Monterey Next Generation Jazz Festival, among other venues.

He also has over two decades of experience in the music and film businesses, with stints at Motown Records, A & M Records and MGM Studios.

This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for more information.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Celebrate ‘Drop Everthing and Read Day’ at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – Children are invited to join a national celebration of famed author Beverly Cleary’s birthday during “Drop Everything and Read Day,” all day Wednesday, April 12, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Drop in any time for the celebration, which is aimed at getting kids to set aside a time to read. It’s free and children of all ages are welcome.

The event will feature a StoryWalk®, in which participants can follow a trail of pages to read a story and receive rewards when they get to the end.

Cleary is the Newberry Award-winning author of the popular Ramona Quimby series of children’s books.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

The StoryWalk® Project was created by Anne Ferguson of Montpelier, VT, and developed in collaboration with the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. StoryWalk® is a registered service mark owned by Ms. Ferguson.

Monday, April 3, 2017

NC food ambassador Bob Garner to speak at Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre

Bob Garner
ASHEBORO – Food writer and North Carolina Weekend commentator Bob Garner will talk about his adventures as a passionate ambassador for Southern food traditions at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 20, at the Sunset Theatre in downtown Asheboro.

Garner’s appearance is free and the public is invited.

It is sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library’s Margaret C. Taylor Memorial Culinary Arts Collection, and by the City of Asheboro, the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau and the Friends of the Library.

Known for his signature yummy noise, “Mmm-mmm!” as restaurants get his stamp of approval on North Carolina Weekend, Garner is author of four books and “Bob Garner Eats,” a 10-part series for Our State magazine.

He also has appeared on national television shows such as Good Morning America, Paula’s Home Cooking with Paula Deen, FoodNation with Bobby Flay, and the Travel Channel’s Road Trip.

His most recent book is Foods that Make You Say Mmm-mmm, which highlights North Carolina’s most unique and best-loved dishes.

He’s also a barbecue expert and pit-master, and serves as the “Minister of Barbecue Culture” at The Pit Authentic Barbecue restaurant in Raleigh. He resides in Greenville, N.C.

The Margaret C. Taylor Memorial Culinary Arts Collection was established from the estate of Margaret Cashatt Taylor, a Randleman area native who passed away in 2015 in Dearborn, Mich. She bequeathed to the library her collection of cooking and other culinary books, and provided a fund to enhance the collection with future book purchases and related programs.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Randolph landmark commission to consider Deep River ford, county seal for designation

ASHEBORO – The Randolph County Historic Landmark Preservation Commission will consider a nomination of the Searcy/Waddell ford and ferry site on Deep River for designation as a Local Cultural Heritage Site during a meeting at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 28, in the Historic Randolph County Courthouse, 145 Worth Street, Asheboro.

The body also will consider designation of the Corporate Seal of the County of Randolph as a Local Cultural Heritage Object.

The meeting is open the public.

Searcy’s Ford crosses the Deep River in Brower Township near the Chatham and Moore County lines. William Searcy received the property in a land grant in 1761, operating a ford and later a ferry where the road from Chatham Courthouse to South Carolina crossed the river. Searcy’s family later sold the property to Edmund Waddell, a prominent business and political figure, who took over operation of the ferry.

In addition to being an important part of area road network during colonial and early statehood periods, the ford and ferry was the site where the Continental Army of General Nathanael Greene crossed the river on its march to South Carolina after the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the Revolutionary War. It also was the site of two skirmishes involving Loyalist commander Col. David Fanning.

The proposed designation also includes the Waddell Memorial Cemetery nearby, where Waddell and Windsor Pearce, one of Randolph County first justices of the peace, are buried. Searcy’s son William Jr., a captain of militia during the Revolutionary War, also is believed to be buried in the cemetery.

The seal under consideration is not the colorful one seen on the side of county vehicles, but a seal obtained by the Randolph County Commissioners in the late 1800s to authenticate official county documents. Known as the Corporate Seal of the County of Randolph, it consists of engraved plates in as seal press that imprint a three-dimensional image onto a document.

It is still in use.

The Historic Landmark Preservation Commissions was created in 2008 to identify, preserve and protect Randolph County’s historic landmarks, and to educate the public about those resources and about preservation in general. So far, the commission has designated 20 sites as Historic Landmarks, 16 places or buildings as Cultural Heritage Sites, and four artifacts or groups of artifacts as Cultural Heritage Objects.

To learn more about the commission and the sites and objects designated, visit http://www.co.randolph.nc.us/Visit-Randolph/Historic-Landmarks/sites. For further information, call the Randolph Room at the Randolph County Public Library, 336-318-6815

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Author Dunlap to explore First Ladies’ fashions in Asheboro library talk

Annette B. Dunlap
ASHEBORO – From the beginning, Americans have paid close attention to how their First Ladies dress, and have expressed opinions about these clothing choices.

Many women have copied a First Lady’s style, while others have wondered about possible political statements behind the choice of colors, style and designer.

In a lively discussion and slide show entitled “First Ladies and the Politics of Fashion,” 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 27, at the Asheboro Public Library, author Annette B. Dunlap will talk about the evolution of First Ladies’ fashion, including the impact fashion had on their public image and what their wardrobes selections revealed about their time periods.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Library, Dunlap’s appearance is free and the public is invited.

Dunlap, who delivered this talk recently at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library, is author of Frank: The Story of Frances Folsom Cleveland, America’s Youngest First Lady — the only complete biography of this historical figure — and The Gambler’s Daughter: A Personal and Social History. Most recently, she published Charles Gates Dawes:  A Life, a biography of Calvin Coolidge’s vice-president.

Dunlap resides in Cumberland County.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Wellness expert Dr. Mike Perko to discuss brain health in Asheboro library talk

Dr. Mike Perko
ASHEBORO – “It’s All in Your Head: Brain Health and Wellness” is the topic of a talk by Dr. Mike Perko at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 20, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Perko’s talk, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Perko, a nationally-recognized wellness expert, says the human brain is a lifelong work in progress, and the saying “use it or lose it” has never been more accurate.

In his talk, he will explore the revolution in neuroplasticity (the ability of the brain to form new connections and reorganize itself), consider the effectiveness of brain games and discuss strategies for incorporating brain health into daily life.

Perko is a professor of Public Health Education at UNC-Greensboro. He holds a Ph.D. in health education and promotion from the University of Alabama.

He also serves as wellness advisor to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Randolph library Friends to host ‘Trivia on Tap’ at Four Saints

ASHEBORO – Test your knowledge of books and reading, movies and music, and local history – and support the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library – at “Trivia on Tap,” 6:30-10 p.m. Tuesday, April 4, at Four Saints Brewing Company.

Ticket price is $25 per person, and includes food and the trivia competition. Proceeds go to support Friends programs such as Books for Babies, children’s activities at the library and literacy.

Tickets are on sale at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street, and the Friends of the Library Bookshop, 226 Sunset Avenue. Call 336-318-6801 to reserve tickets or for more information.

During the friendly competition, participants will answer three rounds of trivia questions in teams of up to four. Participants may sign up in groups as teams, or simply join a team on arrival.

Prizes (and bragging rights!) will be awarded.

There will be a cash bar. Four Saints is located at 218 S. Fayetteville St. in Asheboro.

Monday, February 27, 2017

‘Candid Critters’ cameras now available from Randolph library

ASHEBORO – Motion-activated cameras are now available for check-out from the Randolph County Public Library for participants in the “North Carolina’s Candid Critters” initiative, which enables library users to participate in a statewide wildlife study.

To join the project and check out a camera, sign up and complete brief online training session at NCCandidCritters.org. Cameras will be distributed this week to participants who have already registered.

Candid Critters is a state-sponsored study that makes cameras available through public libraries. Participants check out the cameras to mount on private property or public land, and weeks later retrieve the images for uploading to the Candid Critters website.

Approved participants will be notified by the library to pick up their cameras for a series of three-week deployments. Library staff will be available to help with uploading the images.

Data will be used to map trends in animal populations across the state. Typical images from the project – including deer, bears and bobcats in the eastern part of the state – can be viewed at www.tinyurl.com/candcrit.

Candid Critters is a partnership among NC State University, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, the State Library of NC, NC Cardinal, North Carolina’s public libraries and the Smithsonian.

For further information, contact the library at 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

War Zone: researcher to explore WWII of NC coast in Asheboro library talk

The merchant ship S.S. Dixie Arrow sinks after being torpedoed by
German submarine U-71 near Ocracoke Island on March 26, 1942
[National Archives] 
ASHEBORO – During World War II, an epic battle raged off the North Carolina coast as German submarines stalked merchant shipping, Allied navies hunted the U-boats, and lifesaving crews put to sea to rescue survivors.

Kevin P. Duffus
Award-winning author, researcher and filmmaker Kevin P. Duffus will talk about this confrontation in “War Zone! World War II Off the North Carolina’s Outer Banks,”
6:30  p.m. Thursday, March 9, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Duffus’s appearance, sponsored by the library’s Robert C. Taylor, Jr., Memorial World War II Collection, is free and the public is invited.

Duffus will explore six months in 1942, when 65 U-boats wreaked havoc on merchant shipping along the eastern seaboard, often in view of coastal communities — with the most intense action taking place off North Carolina.

For his talk, Duffus compiles a stunning collection  of eyewitness stories of merchant sailors, Coast Guard recruits and coastal residents who survived the battles. He recounts the U.S. Navy’s response to the attacks, and separates fact from fiction in legends that have grown around the events.

Duffus, who lives in Waynesville, has received a Peabody Award and an Edward R. Murrow Award among other honors. His research has led to the re-discovery of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse’s Fresnel lens, a national treasure, and to new understandings of the pirate Blackbeard and his crew — as well as to the discovery of Blackbeard’s treasure.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Randolph libraries to celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday

Educator and entertainer Steve Somers, a.k.a "The Amazing
Teacher," will help celebrate Dr. Seuss's birthday at 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 9, at the Randleman library.
ASHEBORO – Children and their families are invited to join the celebration of Dr. Seuss’s 113th birthday at three Randolph County libraries in early March.

The Asheboro and Archdale libraries will host birthday parties on the beloved author’s actual birthday, March 2, while Randleman will wait a week.

At the Randleman library, “Celebrate Seuss with Steve Somers” at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, March 9, as the popular educator and entertainer also known as “The Amazing Teacher” presents a fast-paced, high energy show with amazing tricks, a silly puppet, music and tons of audience participation. The library is located at 142 W. Academy Street; call 336-498-3141 for further information.

At Asheboro, it’s “Celebrate Dr. Seuss’s Birthday at the Library,” 3:30 p.m. Thursday, March 2, with stories, games crafts and treats for all ages. The library is located at 201 Worth Street; call 336-318-6804 for further information.

In Archdale, “It’s Party Time” at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 2, as children and families are invited to fête the good doctor with stories, games and refreshments. The library is located at 10433 Main St.; call 336-431-3811 for further information.

Theatre troupe to bring Martin Luther King Jr., African American heroes, to life in two plays at Asheboro library

Bright Star Touring Theatre actors perform
a scene from Meet Dr. King.
ASHEBORO – Asheville’s innovative Bright Star Touring Theatre will present two plays for children in recognition of Black History Month on Monday, February 27, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The group will stage Meet Dr. King at 10:30 a.m. for children pre-school age and older; and Black History Heroes, Soldiers and Spies at  4 p.m. for kids third grade and older. The performances, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, are free and the public is invited.

Meet Dr. King celebrates the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. in an accessible and easy-to-follow story featuring key moments in King’s life, from his childhood in Atlanta and the important lessons passed down by his father, to some of his greatest moments as an inspiring leader.

Black History Heroes, Soldiers and Spies highlights the work of the Buffalo Soldiers, including Col. Charles Young, as they explore and settle the American West; the Tuskegee Airmen as they take flight to help win World War II; and spies such as Mary Elizabeth Bowser, who worked for the Union during the Civil War.

The Bright Star Touring Theatre serves nearly 1,500 audiences each year in schools, theaters, libraries, museums and other venues across the country, offering a wide range of curriculum-based plays and programs. The troupe performs regularly at the National Theatre in Washington, DC, and has taken productions to Russia and Germany.

Now in its 14th year, the company is based in Arden, NC, near Asheville.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.