Monday, April 24, 2017

Learn canning basics at Randolph Cooperative Extension

Jeannie Leonard
ASHEBORO – Join NC Cooperative Extension Agent Jeannie Leonard for “The Basics of Canning” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 – and check out the expanded kitchen facilities – at the new Randolph County Cooperative Extension headquarters, 1003 S. Fayetteville St. (Hillside Shopping Center) in Asheboro.

Find out how to choose the best preservation canning method and see some of the tools used.

Leonard’s talk, sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library and Cooperative Extension, is free and the public is invited. Call 336-318-6803 to reserve a space.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Novelist Joe Epley to debut epic tale of Col. David Fanning at Asheboro library

Joe Epley
ASHEBORO – Get into A Passel of Trouble at the Asheboro Public Library as author Joe Epley debuts his novel about the life of Col. David Fanning, the notorious — or heroic, depending on your point of view — Loyalist militia leader in the Revolutionary War.

Epley, a former Green Beret, journalist and public relations executive, will talk about his book at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 6, at the library. The event, sponsored by the library’s Randolph Room, is free and the public is invited.

Fanning is legendary in Randolph and Chatham counties, where from 1780-1782 he fought pitched battles against supporters of American Independence. He is known for raiding homesteads, killing revolutionary leader Col. Andrew Balfour, nearly burning Col. Philip Alston and his family out of the House in the Horseshoe, and chasing Andrew Hunter – on Fanning’s stolen horse – off Faith Rock into the Deep River.  

In A Passel of Trouble, Epley depicts Fanning as a born leader and a capable young man on the verge of success in South Carolina when war breaks out. As neighbors take sides against each other, Fanning chooses loyalty to the King.

The journey that leads him to Randolph County is seen through the eyes of his friend Josh, who leaves his Quaker faith to join the Loyalist cause.

To help ensure the novel’s historical authenticity, Epley received an assist from local historians Warren Dixon and Mac Whatley with research and fact-checking.

Now retired and a resident of Tryon, N.C., Epley operated Epley Associates, a public relations firm in Charlotte, for 38 years. He’s also author of A Passel of Hate, about the battle of Kings Mountain.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6815.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Learn how to use the Census for family research in Asheboro library class

ASHEBORO – Make sense of the Census for family history research in “Census Sense” with librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer, 2-3:30 p.m. Friday, April 28, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Discover how the Census can help, and what information is often overlooked. Learn about using censuses prior to 1850, common errors and alternative records.

The workshop is free and the public is invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6815.

Celebrate El día de los niños/El día de los libros with Curious George at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – Celebrate El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day) with outdoor stories, games and food from around the world from 11 a.m. -2 p.m. Saturday, April 29, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Bring the family and meet special guest Curious George while celebrating the importance of literacy and reading for children of all cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

The event, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free. All children and their families are invited.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6804.

Music prof to explore life of jazz drummer Max Roach at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO -- The contributions of legendary jazz drummer and North Carolina native Max Lemuel Roach are the focus of a talk by Douglas Jackson, a music professor and performer, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 27, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Jackson will present a multimedia profile of Roach’s life that includes recordings of his music. It’s free and the public is invited.

Roach, a Pasquotank County native, was an innovative master drummer, percussionist and composer who performed and recorded with numerous jazz luminaries including Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk. He performed on over 100 commercial recordings and holds over 100 copyrights.

Jackson, a Los Angeles native, is an assistant professor of music at Elizabeth City State University where he teaches trumpet, music business and jazz ensemble. He has performed on trumpet internationally, including at the Monterey Next Generation Jazz Festival, among other venues.

He also has over two decades of experience in the music and film businesses, with stints at Motown Records, A & M Records and MGM Studios.

This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Friends of the Library.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for more information.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Celebrate ‘Drop Everthing and Read Day’ at Asheboro library

ASHEBORO – Children are invited to join a national celebration of famed author Beverly Cleary’s birthday during “Drop Everything and Read Day,” all day Wednesday, April 12, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Drop in any time for the celebration, which is aimed at getting kids to set aside a time to read. It’s free and children of all ages are welcome.

The event will feature a StoryWalk®, in which participants can follow a trail of pages to read a story and receive rewards when they get to the end.

Cleary is the Newberry Award-winning author of the popular Ramona Quimby series of children’s books.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

The StoryWalk® Project was created by Anne Ferguson of Montpelier, VT, and developed in collaboration with the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. StoryWalk® is a registered service mark owned by Ms. Ferguson.

Monday, April 3, 2017

NC food ambassador Bob Garner to speak at Asheboro’s Sunset Theatre

Bob Garner
ASHEBORO – Food writer and North Carolina Weekend commentator Bob Garner will talk about his adventures as a passionate ambassador for Southern food traditions at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 20, at the Sunset Theatre in downtown Asheboro.

Garner’s appearance is free and the public is invited.

It is sponsored by the Randolph County Public Library’s Margaret C. Taylor Memorial Culinary Arts Collection, and by the City of Asheboro, the Heart of North Carolina Visitors Bureau and the Friends of the Library.

Known for his signature yummy noise, “Mmm-mmm!” as restaurants get his stamp of approval on North Carolina Weekend, Garner is author of four books and “Bob Garner Eats,” a 10-part series for Our State magazine.

He also has appeared on national television shows such as Good Morning America, Paula’s Home Cooking with Paula Deen, FoodNation with Bobby Flay, and the Travel Channel’s Road Trip.

His most recent book is Foods that Make You Say Mmm-mmm, which highlights North Carolina’s most unique and best-loved dishes.

He’s also a barbecue expert and pit-master, and serves as the “Minister of Barbecue Culture” at The Pit Authentic Barbecue restaurant in Raleigh. He resides in Greenville, N.C.

The Margaret C. Taylor Memorial Culinary Arts Collection was established from the estate of Margaret Cashatt Taylor, a Randleman area native who passed away in 2015 in Dearborn, Mich. She bequeathed to the library her collection of cooking and other culinary books, and provided a fund to enhance the collection with future book purchases and related programs.

The Sunset Theatre is located at 234 Sunset Avenue in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Randolph landmark commission to consider Deep River ford, county seal for designation

ASHEBORO – The Randolph County Historic Landmark Preservation Commission will consider a nomination of the Searcy/Waddell ford and ferry site on Deep River for designation as a Local Cultural Heritage Site during a meeting at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 28, in the Historic Randolph County Courthouse, 145 Worth Street, Asheboro.

The body also will consider designation of the Corporate Seal of the County of Randolph as a Local Cultural Heritage Object.

The meeting is open the public.

Searcy’s Ford crosses the Deep River in Brower Township near the Chatham and Moore County lines. William Searcy received the property in a land grant in 1761, operating a ford and later a ferry where the road from Chatham Courthouse to South Carolina crossed the river. Searcy’s family later sold the property to Edmund Waddell, a prominent business and political figure, who took over operation of the ferry.

In addition to being an important part of area road network during colonial and early statehood periods, the ford and ferry was the site where the Continental Army of General Nathanael Greene crossed the river on its march to South Carolina after the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the Revolutionary War. It also was the site of two skirmishes involving Loyalist commander Col. David Fanning.

The proposed designation also includes the Waddell Memorial Cemetery nearby, where Waddell and Windsor Pearce, one of Randolph County first justices of the peace, are buried. Searcy’s son William Jr., a captain of militia during the Revolutionary War, also is believed to be buried in the cemetery.

The seal under consideration is not the colorful one seen on the side of county vehicles, but a seal obtained by the Randolph County Commissioners in the late 1800s to authenticate official county documents. Known as the Corporate Seal of the County of Randolph, it consists of engraved plates in as seal press that imprint a three-dimensional image onto a document.

It is still in use.

The Historic Landmark Preservation Commissions was created in 2008 to identify, preserve and protect Randolph County’s historic landmarks, and to educate the public about those resources and about preservation in general. So far, the commission has designated 20 sites as Historic Landmarks, 16 places or buildings as Cultural Heritage Sites, and four artifacts or groups of artifacts as Cultural Heritage Objects.

To learn more about the commission and the sites and objects designated, visit http://www.co.randolph.nc.us/Visit-Randolph/Historic-Landmarks/sites. For further information, call the Randolph Room at the Randolph County Public Library, 336-318-6815

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Author Dunlap to explore First Ladies’ fashions in Asheboro library talk

Annette B. Dunlap
ASHEBORO – From the beginning, Americans have paid close attention to how their First Ladies dress, and have expressed opinions about these clothing choices.

Many women have copied a First Lady’s style, while others have wondered about possible political statements behind the choice of colors, style and designer.

In a lively discussion and slide show entitled “First Ladies and the Politics of Fashion,” 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 27, at the Asheboro Public Library, author Annette B. Dunlap will talk about the evolution of First Ladies’ fashion, including the impact fashion had on their public image and what their wardrobes selections revealed about their time periods.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Library, Dunlap’s appearance is free and the public is invited.

Dunlap, who delivered this talk recently at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library, is author of Frank: The Story of Frances Folsom Cleveland, America’s Youngest First Lady — the only complete biography of this historical figure — and The Gambler’s Daughter: A Personal and Social History. Most recently, she published Charles Gates Dawes:  A Life, a biography of Calvin Coolidge’s vice-president.

Dunlap resides in Cumberland County.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Wellness expert Dr. Mike Perko to discuss brain health in Asheboro library talk

Dr. Mike Perko
ASHEBORO – “It’s All in Your Head: Brain Health and Wellness” is the topic of a talk by Dr. Mike Perko at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 20, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Perko’s talk, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

Perko, a nationally-recognized wellness expert, says the human brain is a lifelong work in progress, and the saying “use it or lose it” has never been more accurate.

In his talk, he will explore the revolution in neuroplasticity (the ability of the brain to form new connections and reorganize itself), consider the effectiveness of brain games and discuss strategies for incorporating brain health into daily life.

Perko is a professor of Public Health Education at UNC-Greensboro. He holds a Ph.D. in health education and promotion from the University of Alabama.

He also serves as wellness advisor to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Randolph library Friends to host ‘Trivia on Tap’ at Four Saints

ASHEBORO – Test your knowledge of books and reading, movies and music, and local history – and support the Friends of the Randolph County Public Library – at “Trivia on Tap,” 6:30-10 p.m. Tuesday, April 4, at Four Saints Brewing Company.

Ticket price is $25 per person, and includes food and the trivia competition. Proceeds go to support Friends programs such as Books for Babies, children’s activities at the library and literacy.

Tickets are on sale at the Asheboro Public Library, 201 Worth Street, and the Friends of the Library Bookshop, 226 Sunset Avenue. Call 336-318-6801 to reserve tickets or for more information.

During the friendly competition, participants will answer three rounds of trivia questions in teams of up to four. Participants may sign up in groups as teams, or simply join a team on arrival.

Prizes (and bragging rights!) will be awarded.

There will be a cash bar. Four Saints is located at 218 S. Fayetteville St. in Asheboro.

Monday, February 27, 2017

‘Candid Critters’ cameras now available from Randolph library

ASHEBORO – Motion-activated cameras are now available for check-out from the Randolph County Public Library for participants in the “North Carolina’s Candid Critters” initiative, which enables library users to participate in a statewide wildlife study.

To join the project and check out a camera, sign up and complete brief online training session at NCCandidCritters.org. Cameras will be distributed this week to participants who have already registered.

Candid Critters is a state-sponsored study that makes cameras available through public libraries. Participants check out the cameras to mount on private property or public land, and weeks later retrieve the images for uploading to the Candid Critters website.

Approved participants will be notified by the library to pick up their cameras for a series of three-week deployments. Library staff will be available to help with uploading the images.

Data will be used to map trends in animal populations across the state. Typical images from the project – including deer, bears and bobcats in the eastern part of the state – can be viewed at www.tinyurl.com/candcrit.

Candid Critters is a partnership among NC State University, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, the State Library of NC, NC Cardinal, North Carolina’s public libraries and the Smithsonian.

For further information, contact the library at 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

War Zone: researcher to explore WWII of NC coast in Asheboro library talk

The merchant ship S.S. Dixie Arrow sinks after being torpedoed by
German submarine U-71 near Ocracoke Island on March 26, 1942
[National Archives] 
ASHEBORO – During World War II, an epic battle raged off the North Carolina coast as German submarines stalked merchant shipping, Allied navies hunted the U-boats, and lifesaving crews put to sea to rescue survivors.

Kevin P. Duffus
Award-winning author, researcher and filmmaker Kevin P. Duffus will talk about this confrontation in “War Zone! World War II Off the North Carolina’s Outer Banks,”
6:30  p.m. Thursday, March 9, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Duffus’s appearance, sponsored by the library’s Robert C. Taylor, Jr., Memorial World War II Collection, is free and the public is invited.

Duffus will explore six months in 1942, when 65 U-boats wreaked havoc on merchant shipping along the eastern seaboard, often in view of coastal communities — with the most intense action taking place off North Carolina.

For his talk, Duffus compiles a stunning collection  of eyewitness stories of merchant sailors, Coast Guard recruits and coastal residents who survived the battles. He recounts the U.S. Navy’s response to the attacks, and separates fact from fiction in legends that have grown around the events.

Duffus, who lives in Waynesville, has received a Peabody Award and an Edward R. Murrow Award among other honors. His research has led to the re-discovery of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse’s Fresnel lens, a national treasure, and to new understandings of the pirate Blackbeard and his crew — as well as to the discovery of Blackbeard’s treasure.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6803.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Randolph libraries to celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday

Educator and entertainer Steve Somers, a.k.a "The Amazing
Teacher," will help celebrate Dr. Seuss's birthday at 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 9, at the Randleman library.
ASHEBORO – Children and their families are invited to join the celebration of Dr. Seuss’s 113th birthday at three Randolph County libraries in early March.

The Asheboro and Archdale libraries will host birthday parties on the beloved author’s actual birthday, March 2, while Randleman will wait a week.

At the Randleman library, “Celebrate Seuss with Steve Somers” at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, March 9, as the popular educator and entertainer also known as “The Amazing Teacher” presents a fast-paced, high energy show with amazing tricks, a silly puppet, music and tons of audience participation. The library is located at 142 W. Academy Street; call 336-498-3141 for further information.

At Asheboro, it’s “Celebrate Dr. Seuss’s Birthday at the Library,” 3:30 p.m. Thursday, March 2, with stories, games crafts and treats for all ages. The library is located at 201 Worth Street; call 336-318-6804 for further information.

In Archdale, “It’s Party Time” at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 2, as children and families are invited to fête the good doctor with stories, games and refreshments. The library is located at 10433 Main St.; call 336-431-3811 for further information.

Theatre troupe to bring Martin Luther King Jr., African American heroes, to life in two plays at Asheboro library

Bright Star Touring Theatre actors perform
a scene from Meet Dr. King.
ASHEBORO – Asheville’s innovative Bright Star Touring Theatre will present two plays for children in recognition of Black History Month on Monday, February 27, at the Asheboro Public Library.

The group will stage Meet Dr. King at 10:30 a.m. for children pre-school age and older; and Black History Heroes, Soldiers and Spies at  4 p.m. for kids third grade and older. The performances, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, are free and the public is invited.

Meet Dr. King celebrates the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. in an accessible and easy-to-follow story featuring key moments in King’s life, from his childhood in Atlanta and the important lessons passed down by his father, to some of his greatest moments as an inspiring leader.

Black History Heroes, Soldiers and Spies highlights the work of the Buffalo Soldiers, including Col. Charles Young, as they explore and settle the American West; the Tuskegee Airmen as they take flight to help win World War II; and spies such as Mary Elizabeth Bowser, who worked for the Union during the Civil War.

The Bright Star Touring Theatre serves nearly 1,500 audiences each year in schools, theaters, libraries, museums and other venues across the country, offering a wide range of curriculum-based plays and programs. The troupe performs regularly at the National Theatre in Washington, DC, and has taken productions to Russia and Germany.

Now in its 14th year, the company is based in Arden, NC, near Asheville.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Teen ‘Pottery Slam!’ returns to Asheboro library

Joseph Sand
ASHEBORO – Get hands-on experience throwing pots and spinning clay creations in the 6th annual TeenZone “Pottery Slam!” from noon-2 p.m. Saturday, February 25, at the Asheboro Public Library.

All teens are invited to join local potters Joseph Sand and Dawn Tagawa, who will provide guidance as participants get to work. Sponsored by the Friends of the Library and in partnership with the Randolph Arts Guild, the Pottery Slam is free and all supplies are provided.

Completed pieces will be fired and placed on display at the library for a few weeks, and then returned to their makers.

Dawn Tagawa
Sand graduated with honors with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in General Studio Art from the University of Minnesota-Duluth with a ceramics emphasis. After graduation, Sand left for North Carolina where he completed an apprenticeship under master potter Mark Hewitt.

He operates Joseph Sand Pottery near Randleman, featuring functional and sculptural wood-fired ceramics.

Tagawa’s work, which can be purchased online through Etsy, has been recognized in numerous area exhibitions and craft shows. She believes good pottery should have depth, character and flow.

Her aim is to create pieces where the parts merge to form a whole that is intriguing and pleasing to the eye as well as to the touch.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street in Asheboro. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

Use photos to enhance genealogy research in Asheboro library workshop

ASHEBORO  -- The Randolph County Public Library’s genealogy workshop series continues with “A Picture is Worth 1,000 Words,” 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesday, February 21, at the Asheboro Public Library. Librarian and genealogist Ann Palmer will show you how to enhance your family history with photos, and what to do when you don’t have a them.

It’s free and the public is invited.

The final class in the series, “Those Elusive Females,” focuses on tracing maternal family trees and is slated for 2-4 p.m. Saturday, March 11.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6815.

Get the buzz on beekeeping in Asheboro library workshop

ASHEBORO – Learn about the importance of bees to your backyard garden, and how to cultivate them, in “Basics of Beekeeping at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, February 22, at the Asheboro library.

The workshop is free and the public is invited.

Carol Kivett of the Randolph County Beekeeper Association will talk about how the insects make your garden bloom, take a look at supplies you need to host a hive, and answer questions about beekeeping.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.

WFU anthropologist to explore Gullah culture in Asheboro library talk

Dr. Andrew Gurstelle
ASHEBORO – Descended from enslaved Africans, the Gullah people of the southeast Atlantic coast have developed a unique culture rich with linguistic, religious and social practices influenced by their African heritage.

Using artifacts and images from the exhibition “Visions of Home: A Celebration of Gullah Culture in the Southeast” at the Wake Forest University Museum of Anthropology, museum academic director Dr. Andrew Gurstelle will explore Gullah history and culture in a talk at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 23, at the Asheboro library.

Gurstelle’s talk, sponsored by the Friends of the Library, is free and the public is invited.

As a museum anthropologist and archaeologist, his curatorial work emphasizes putting objects in context historically and culturally. He also is an assistant teaching professor.

“Visions of Home” is on display through April 22. The museum is located on Wake Forest’s Reynolda Campus.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6803.


Thursday, February 2, 2017

‘NC KIDS’ ebook resource for children launches through state's public libraries

 NC KIDS Digital Library
ASHEBORO – A massive new collection of downloadable ebooks, audiobooks and streaming videos for children pre-K through 4th grade is now available from North Carolina’s public libraries, including the Randolph County Public Library.

The NC KIDS Digital Library launched on February 1 with an initial collection of over 3,700 titles that can be checked out by any public library cardholder in the state.

Access is available 24/7 via the Randolph library’s website (www.randolphlibrary.org) and directly from the NC KIDS website (https://nckids.overdrive.com), or through the Overdrive ebook app. The collection is accessible on all major computers and devices, including iOS®, Android™, Chromebook™ and Kindle®.

The collection includes 3,029 ebooks, 689 audiobooks and 37 streaming videos. The ebooks include many suitable for reading along or reading and listening.

Most of the titles check out to one user at a time, like traditional library books, but 300 are available for simultaneous use, meaning they are available to all users anytime with no waiting lists. Users can check out up to five books at a time.

NC KIDS is an initiative of the North Carolina Public Library Directors Association (NCPLDA), with support from the State Library of North Carolina. The North Carolina General Assembly provided funding to the State Library for content in the current budget year, and the state’s 81 public library systems are chipping in to cover the cost of the OverDrive platform which provides access to the collection.

Additional titles will be added soon, and libraries will continue to provide funding to add new material and ensure that the collection remains current.

Although the NC KIDS collection will be separate from the Randolph library’s Digital Depot ebooks, it will be accessible in the same way and on any device. Instructions will be provided, and staff will be available to help users with downloads.

For further information or assistance using NC KIDS, visit the library or call 336-318-6804.

Author to share Strieby community history in Asheboro library talk

Margo Lee Williams
ASHEBORO – The unique history and impact of an African American community in southwestern Randolph County is the focus of historian Margo Lee Williams’s new book, From Hill Town to Strieby: Education and the American Missionary Association in the “Back Country” of Randolph County, North Carolina.

Williams will talk about the history and people of Strieby, and sign copies of her award-winning book, at 2 p.m. Saturday, February 18, at the Asheboro Public Library. Her appearance is sponsored by the Randolph Room, the library’s local history and genealogy department.

Hill Town grew in the 1840s around the homeplace  of Edward (Ned) Hill, a free person of color, and his wife Priscilla, a freed slave. In the 1880s, the community established a school, a Congregational church and a U.S. Post Office.

Renamed Strieby after a church leader, the community flourished.  Strieby was designated as a Local Cultural Heritage Site by the Randolph County Historic Landmark Preservation Commission in 2013, based on Williams’s nomination.

Central to the community’s history is the Rev. Islay Walden who, freed from slavery at the end of the Civil War, nearly blind and almost illiterate, walked to Washington, D.C., to gain an education and seek treatment for his poor eyesight.

He returned 10 years later as an esteemed academic, ordained minister and nationally known poet. His mission was to establish a school in Hill Town with the support of the American Missionary Association.

Willliams’s book documents Walden’s story and the continued development of education in the community. It also provides an exhaustive genealogy of Strieby families, profiles notable members of the community and takes a look at Strieby today.

The book received the 2016 Marsha M. Greenlee History Award from the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and the 2016 Historical Book Award from the North Carolina Society of Historians. It grew out of Williams’s research into her Lassiter family ancestors of the Lassiter Mill area in Randolph County, and picks up where her first book, Miles Lassiter, an Early African American Quaker, left off.

Williams, who lives in Silver Springs, MD,  operates a genealogical research firm, Personal Prologue. She holds masters degrees in sociology and religious education.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call the Randolph Room at 336-318-6815.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

P.A.L. (Play and Learn) Club goes on the road in February

ASHEBORO – The Randolph County Public Library’s P.A.L. (Play and Learn) Club for children age 0-5 and their parents/caregivers goes on the road in February to learn about the shapes around us.

Build Play-Doh shapes, fill them up, sort them and make a shape collage – even make magic disappearing shapes – at four libraries:
  • Archdale Public Library (10433 S. Main St.) — 10:30 a.m. Thursday, February 23;
  • Liberty Public Library (239 S. Fayettevillle St.) — 11 a.m. Wednesday, February 15;
  • Ramseur Public Library (1512 S. Main St.) — 10:30 a.m. Thursday, February 16;
  • Seagrove Public Library (530 Old Plank Road) — 1:30 p.m. Thursday, February 9.
The P.A.L. club is free and all supplies are provided.

For more information, call 336-318-6804.

Gardeners: get ready for NC growing season in Asheboro library talk

Ben Grandon
ASHEBORO – North Carolina’s long growing season is almost here! Get ready with tips and techniques in “Backyard Gardening,” 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 9, at the Asheboro Public Library.

Ben Grandon, Randolph County Cooperative Extension agriculture-horticulture agent, will talk about equipment and supplies, answer gardening questions, and share information on Cooperative Extension services.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. Call 336-318-6803 for further information.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Check out wildlife camera from library, capture ‘Candid Critters’

Black bear photographed in Jones County.
(http://www.tinyurl.com/candcrit)
This work is licensed under a
CreativeCommons Attirbution-
NonCommercialShareAlike
4.0 International license.
ASHEBORO – What animals are frolicking in your backyard while you’re at work, or lurking there after the sun goes down?

Sign up for North Carolina’s Candid Critters, check out a camera from the Asheboro Public Library, and find out!

Candid Critters is a state-sponsored wildlife study that makes motion-triggered cameras available through public libraries. Participants check out the cameras to mount on private property or public land, and weeks later retrieve the images for viewing and uploading.

Anyone interested must first register at NCCandidCritters.org. Participants will receive an invitation to join and must complete an online training course.

Cameras for approved participants will be available at the Asheboro Public Library in mid-February for a series of three-week deployments. Library staff will be available to help with uploading images to the Candid Critters website.

Data will be used to map trends in animal populations across the state. Typical images from the project can be viewed at www.tinyurl.com/candcrit.

Candid Critters is a partnership among NC State University, the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, the State Library of NC, NC Cardinal, North Carolina public libraries and the Smithsonian.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, contact the library at 336-318-6803.

Friday, January 20, 2017

Asheboro library fills up February with fun for kids

ASHEBORO – From Arts and Crafts at the beginning of the month to two theatrical performances in one day at the end, the Asheboro Public library is full of fun for kids in February.

All the events are free.

Children of all ages are invited to make a Valentine-themed craft during the monthly Arts & Crafts event at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, February 2. All supplies are provided.

It’s “Take Your Child to the Library Day” from  11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, February 4, featuring an open house in the Children’s Room with ongoing storytimes and other activities, appearances by Pete the Cat, and interaction with library therapy dogs.

During a Homeschool Meet & Greet at 2 p.m. Tuesday, February 7, parents can discover the library’s local history and genealogy services while tweens and teens learn about TeenZone activities and events, and younger children join in a craft and a storytime.

The P.A.L. (Play and Learn) Club, for children ages 0-5 and their parents/caregivers, will play and sing about love, and make wax paper hearts, at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, February 8.

Catch a movie – and a wave – at 4 p.m. Thursday, February 16 as the library screens Surf’s Up 2: Wavemania. Celebrate National Canned Food Month by bringing a canned food item for the CUOC food pantry.

This month’s Maker Series, at 4 p.m. Thursday, February 23, for ages 8-12, features a Do-It-Yourself (DIY) project.

Asheville’s Bright Star Touring Theatre will present two plays in celebration of Black History Month on Monday, February 27: Meet Dr. King at 10:30 a.m.; and Black History Heroes, Soldiers and Spies at 4 p.m.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6804.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Celebrate ‘Take Your Child to the Library Day’ February 4 at Asheboro library


ASHEBORO – Join in an international event and celebrate “Take Your Child to the Library Day” (TYCLD), an open house from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, February 4, at the Asheboro Public Library showcasing the library’s children’s services and ongoing activities for kids.

Special guest will be Pete the Cat, who will pose for pictures (bring your camera!). Pete also will host storytimes at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., and Music and Movement events at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m.

Throughout the day, drop in at Play and Learn Centers, an Arts & Crafts station, a children’s DIY project, and a lifesize Snakes and Ladders game. Meet therapy dogs from the library’s Tails to Read initiative — Olive, Alley Oop and Suzie — and spend a few minutes reading to one of the pups.

The Friends of the Library will provide refreshments.

Now in its sixth year, TYCLD is an international initiative that encourages families everywhere to take their children to their local library. Launched in Connecticut in 2011, TYCLD raises awareness about the importance of the library in the life of a child, and promotes library services and programs for children and families.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For more information, call 336-318-6804.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Library’s Randolph Room adjusts hours

ASHEBORO – The Randolph Room, local history and genealogy department of the Randolph County Public Library located at the Asheboro library, will be open Monday and Tuesday evenings effective January 3.

The change enables the room to be available on nights when the library is busiest. The new schedule also extends hours to 6 p.m. on weekdays when the room is not open at night.

The new hours will be Monday-Tuesday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

The changes result in a net increase of one hour open per week.

The Randolph Room’s hours differ from the hours of the rest of the Asheboro library, which is open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday; and 9 a..m-5 p.m. Saturday.

The library is located at 201 Worth Street. For further information, call 336-318-6815 or visit www.randolphlibrary.org/randolphroom.htm.